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New York GOP state senator busted for secretly continuing to pay aide who resigned over sex harassment claims

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Former New York State Sen. George D. Maziarz (R-Niagara) will avoid a criminal trial next week after pleading guilty on Friday to hiding salary payments to a disgraced former staffer, The Buffalo News reported.

Former Sen. Maziarz, 64, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of “filing a false instrument.” He had been facing trial on five felony charges.

“His career ended…and it was the end of being the boss of bosses in Niagara County,” Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman said. “We exposed what happened.”

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The scandal centered around former senate staffer Glenn Aronow, who officially worked for Maziarz, until resigning after allegations of sexual harassment, the Lockport Journal reported.

Sen. Maziarz allegedly hid payments to continue Aronow’s employment, utilizing a “multi-layered pass-through scheme” involving his campaign account and the Niagara County Republican Committee.

Albany County Court Judge Peter Lynch asked Maziarz whether he intended to use Aronow’s services and “took steps to continue his services without the public knowing about it.”

“Yes,” the former senator replied.

In the 1990s, Maziarz pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of failing to list the true identity of a campaign contributor.

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“Prosecutors shy away from cases with a lot of risk. We’ve been willing to do them; certainly way more than anyone in the office before,” Scheiderman continued. “And that sends a message that ‘you better watch yourself.’”

During a two decade career in the legislature, Sen. Maziarz was a leader of the “Senate Coup” when breakaway Democrats gave minority Republicans control of the body.

“You cannot use your campaign account as a slush fund to avoid public scrutiny,” Schneiderman told the Time Union.

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‘Dirty’ Jared Kushner should be targeted if GOP makes impeachment trial about Bidens: strategist

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President Donald Trump has signaled that he wants Senate Republicans to turn his impeachment trial around on Democrats by actually making it a trial of the Biden family.

The president on Thursday signaled that he wants former Vice President Joe Biden and his son, Hunter Biden, to testify at his impeachment trial in an effort to make the trial less about his own misconduct and more about purported misconduct by the Democrats.

However, Democratic strategist Simon Rosenberg on Thursday proposed a plan to counter this kind of misdirection: Going after Trump son-in-law Jared Kushner, whose shady dealings with world leaders have so far escaped significant scrutiny.

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Democrats crippled their own impeachment effort with a rushed timeline: columnist

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House Democrats made a conscious decision to keep impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump as short and efficient as possible. On one hand, they had sensible reasons for wanting to do so — they were concerned that a protracted impeachment battle that drags into the 2020 election would lose engagement with the American people and draw criticism for attempting to interfere with the election.

But Thursday, NBC News analyst Kurt Bardella argued that Democrats may also have caused problems for themselves by making the impeachment process too short and setting arbitrary deadlines.

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GOP now stands for ‘Gang of Putin’: Conservative slams Republican ‘affinity’ for Russian president

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For aging Gen-Xers and Baby Boomers who are old enough to remember the Cold War, the admiration that the alt-right has for Russian President Vladimir Putin — a former KGB agent — is quite ironic. And that irony isn’t lost on conservative Washington Post columnist Max Boot, who is highly critical of President Donald Trump’s pro-Putin outlook in his December 4 column.

Boot, now 50, was born in Moscow on September 12, 1969 — back when Moscow was still part of the Soviet Union. But he was still a kid when his parents fled the Soviet Union and moved to Los Angeles, where he grew up. The Soviet Union ceased to exist in the early 1990s, and Putin is a right-wing authoritarian — not a communist. Boot, however, emphasizes in his column that Russia is still no friend of the United States.

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