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‘Is she stoned?’: The internet mocks Kellyanne Conway for saying millennials should choose ice cream over drugs

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During an interview at Generation Next, a millennial forum hosted in D.C. on Thursday, White House adviser and opioid epidemic chief Kellyanne Conway said young people could avoid fentanyl by eating ice cream and french fries. Upon hearing her sage advice, Twitter had a field day.

“On our college campuses,” Conway told her millennial interviewers, “you folks are reading the labels, they won’t put any sugar in their body, they won’t eat carbs anymore, and they’re very, very fastidious about what goes into their body.”

“And then you buy a street drug for $5 or $10, it’s laced with fentanyl and that’s it,” she continued.

“My short advice is, eat the ice cream, have the French fry, don’t buy the street drug,” the Trump administration’s chief opioid counselor advised. “Believe me, it all works out.”

“Dear God,” Splinter’s Katherine Kreuger tweeted in response to Conway’s advice. “We’re all f*cked.”

“Go home, people,” comedian Thronton McEnery responded. “We just won the war on drugs.”

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Trump supporters are furious that knitting website Ravelry took a stand on white supremacy

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When you think of the knitting community, you might envision an elderly woman, sitting on a rocking chair in front of a fire with a pair of large knitting needles. In truth, the knitting and crocheting demographic has changed drastically in the twenty-first century, becoming younger, hipper, and increasingly tied to DIY culture.

Ravelry is a website where both millennials and knitting grannies (among other demographics) meet to talk about knitting, crocheting, weaving, and other craft and fabric arts. But if you plan to crochet a MAGA hat or knit a Trump sweater, think twice about posting it on Ravelry. The forum-style website, which is often described as "Facebook for knitters," recently issued a statement that they would ban open support of Donald Trump on their site. The widely-publicized move suggests that even communities that aren’t seen as specifically political — like knitters — are becoming politicized, sometimes in toxic ways, in an epoch of extreme political polarization in the United States.

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2020 Election

George Conway warns Nikki Haley about replacing Pence on GOP’s 2020 ticket without vetting the rape allegations against Trump

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The husband of White House counselor Kellyanne Conway warned former Ambassador Nikki Haley against running for vice president on Donald Trump's ticket in 2020.

There has been speculation that Trump could replace Vice President Mike Pence on the ticket as a way to shore up poor poll numbers.

Republican strategist Amanda Carpenter downplayed the notion that a substitution would be successful.

"If you think putting Nikki Haley on a ticket with Donald Trump will solve his problems with women voters, you don’t understand the problems women voters have with Donald Trump," Carpenter explained.

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Kentucky judge rules GOP governor broke the law by concealing data about his plan to gut retirement benefits for teachers

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On Monday, the Courier-Journal reported that a state judge in Kentucky found Gov. Matt Bevin violated the state's Open Records Act by concealing an economic analysis of his administration's 2017 plan to "reform" the Kentucky Retirement System.

Franklin Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd ordered Bevin's administration to release the records, and to pay roughly $73,000 in attorneys' fees to the person who made the public records request for the documents.

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 ENOUGH IS ENOUGH 

Trump endorses killing journalists, like Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi. Online ad networks are now targeting sites that cover acts of violence against dissidents, LGBTQ people and people of color.

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