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Texas sees huge surge of Democratic voters in first primary of 2018 elections

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We tracked how many Texans turned out to vote early in the 2018 primaries compared with primaries in 2010 and 2014, the last two midterm election years.

Coming off of a highly contested presidential election and with various high-profile statewide and congressional elections on the ballot, over 650,000 Texans voted early in the state’s ten counties with the highest number of registered voters.

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Overall, 370,219 Democrats voted early in those ten counties compared to 282,928 Republicans. Four years earlier, Republicans outvoted Democrats in early voting in those ten counties 253,019 to 184,489, respectively. That means Democratic turnout more than doubled from four years ago, while Republican turnout rose less than 15 percent.

When we factor population growth in these ten counties, Republican turnout was largely unchanged, with the percent of the voting-age population voting early remaining on-trend with previous years. Democratic turnout, however, was up in all ten counties except for Hidalgo County, which saw a drop in Democratic voter turnout from 6.1% of the voting age population voting early in 2014, to 5.1% in 2018.

Travis County saw the highest jump in Democratic voter turnout with over 6% of the voting age population, or 56,426 voters, showing up to vote early, a 4 percentage-point increase from the 2014 election.

This page provides two different ways to get a sense of turnout. One set of graphs compares raw in-person turnout with past numbers in the 10 counties with the highest number of registered voters. The other set of graphs takes population growth into account by showing the percentage of each county’s voting-age population that showed up to vote each year. Toggle between both sets of graphs to see how early voting turnout fared for both Democrats and Republicans across the state.

Election day in Texas is March 6th. To see all the statewide and legislative races on the ballot, click here.

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Harris County Texas voter data

Dallas County voter data Tarrant County voter data Bexar County voter data Travis County Collin County voter turnout El Paso County Texas voter turnout Hidalgo County Texas voting data Denton County Texas voting data Fort Bend County Texas voting data


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New York firefighter gets emotional talking about EMTs who feel guilty they’re too sick to work

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The New York Fire Department is struggling to make its way through the coronavirus crisis. Currently, 493 members of the NYFD have tested positive for COVID-19 and more than 3,000 are out sick.

Anthony Almojera, an EMS Lieutenant-paramedic for the FDNY told CNN Tuesday that he doesn't know how they're managing the constant influx of calls for help from New Yorkers.

"It's truly a testament to the EMS workers that we have here, the EMTs and medics," he told host Jim Sciutto. "It's pretty amazing to see how they're going out in spite of seeing all their co-workers get sick. It's frightening for a lot of us. We don't want to bring it home. We don't want to get sick with it but, you know, this is our job, we treat the sick and injured. We still have all of our regular 9-1-1 calls. It's truly a testament to the EMTs."

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‘Can we get a refund?’ Trump flack Stephanie Grisham faces a landslide of mockery after her abrupt dismissal

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White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham is reportedly being relieved of her duties after having gone a full ten months on the job without holding a single press briefing.

Given that Grisham hauled in a salary of $183,000 despite never actually appearing before reporters to answer questions, some Americans are asking if we can get a "refund" for her purported services.

Others, meanwhile, are simply happy to see her leave despite having rarely, if ever, seen her talk in public.

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Trump’s history as a sketchy vitamin company pitchman might help explain his hydroxychloroquine obsession: report

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In an attempt to understand the myriad of reasons why Donald Trump has gone all-in on pushing hydroxychloroquine as the possible solution to the COVID-19 pandemic, the former spokesperson for the Republican National Committee noted that the president once was the owner of a sketchy vitamin company under the Trump brand.

Writing for the conservative Bulwark, Tim Miller posed the question: "Why is Trump obsessed with hydroxychloroquine?' by noting the president has become one of, if not its biggest, proponents.

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