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Trump throws support behind Pennsylvania Republican who threatens to ‘rule with the fear of God’

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President Donald Trump is backing a Christian nationalist Republican candidate in a Pennsylvania special election.

State Rep. Rick Saccone (R-Elizabeth) is running against former federal prosecutor Conor Lamb for the 18th congressional district seat vacated by Republican Tim Murphy, and the president will campaign in the district he won by 20 points.

“It’s you and me against the fake news in the fight to elect Republicans like Rick Saccone to Congress,” Trump wrote in a campaign email.

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“The president feels really great about those who are pushing for his agenda of lower taxes and fewer regulations and a stronger military, a well-funded military, people who believe in the coal-mining industry, steel, aluminum and manufacturing,” said White House adviser Kellyanne Conway, who took part Thursday in a Saccone fundraiser. “And it seems that Rick Saccone is right there with the president on those issues and that’s important because the president wants reliable votes in Washington.”

The race is considered a tossup just days ahead of the March 13 special election, and the GOP is bracing for a potentially embarrassing defeat.

Saccone, a career foreign service officer who spent years on the Korean peninsula, initially announced last year that he would run for the U.S. Senate, but he later decided to shoot for the House seat that opened up when news broke that Murphy, a pro-life Republican, had asked his pregnant mistress to get an abortion.

Christian nationalist pseudo-historian David Barton and Sam Rohrer, a former Pennsylvania state representative who now heads the American Pastors Network, led an opening prayer for Saccone’s senatorial campaign.

Afterward, reported Right Wing Watch, Saccone appeared on Rohrer’s radio program, where he said that he is running for Congress because God wants “people who will rule with the fear of God in them to rule over us.”

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Those comments, and Saccone’s close association with Barton and Rohrer, illustrate his view of government as the political arm of the church.

Saccone credits divine intervention for Trump’s election win and warns God will judge the United States for placing women in positions of political leadership, and he blamed the mass shooting at an Orlando gay nightclub on LGBT rights.

“For two generations, our children have not been taught the virtue of the founding and the founders,” Saccone said during a 2015 prayer rally. “Secularists have disparaged our past and erased any trace of our godly heritage. They deny American exceptionalism and they condemn patriotism. And I tell you this, if we don’t teach our children to honor God and love their country, the secularists will teach them not to.”

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75 years ago: When atomic scientist Leo Szilard tried to halt dropping bombs over Japan

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As this troubled summer rolls along, and the world begins to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the creation, and use, of the first atomic bombs, many special, or especially tragic, days will draw special attention.  They will include July 16 (first test of the weapon in New Mexico), August 6 (bomb dropped over Hiroshima) and August 9 (over Nagasaki).   Surely far fewer in the media and elsewhere will mark another key date:  July 3.

On July 3, 1945, the great atomic scientist Leo Szilard finished a letter/petition that would become the strongest (virtually the only) real attempt at halting President Truman's march to using the atomic bomb--still almost two weeks from its first test at Trinity--against Japanese cities.

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‘Insane’: Park ranger shoots unarmed man through his heart and then handcuffs his dead body

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A ranger at Carlsbad Caverns National Park tased and then fatally shot a man during a New Mexico traffic stop and then handcuffed his lifeless body.

Charles "Gage" Lorentz was traveling March 21 from his work site in Pecos, Texas, to his family's home in southwest Colorado when he detoured at the national park to meet a friend, and that's where he encountered National Park Ranger Robert Mitchell, reported KOB-TV.

The ranger stopped the 25-year-old Lorentz for speeding on a dirt road near the park's Rattlesnake Springs area, and Mitchell's lapel video shows him ordering Lorentz to spread his feet and move closer to a railing.

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Former Trump administration official refers to a renowned Black scholar as ‘some criminal’

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President Donald Trump's former Attorney General Jeff Sessions referred to renowned Black Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. as "some criminal" in an interview with The New York Times Magazine.

Sessions, one of Trump's earliest supporters who was later fired after years of attacks from the president, is currently attempting to reclaim his old Senate seat in Alabama. Sessions has desperately tried to tout his Trumpist credentials on the campaign trail, even as the president has waged a campaign aimed at sabotaging his primary bid.

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