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This insomnia map reveals it’s hard to sleep when you didn’t vote for the maniac in charge

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There is nothing like the quiet of night to remind you of your every poor life choice and potential impending failure. As if that wasn’t enough to worry about, Americans just elected a president who signs executive orders without reading them and whose foreign policy is mostly just being unpredictable. That’s justifiably nerve-racking for a certain type of person—the kind who loses sleep over things like, say, nuclear war as a distraction from scandal. Maybe that explains why a new internet site that tracks insomnia sufferers by geographic location has a million points of light along the coasts, in the cities and towns that still can’t believe Donald Trump won this whole thing.

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The Sleep Loss map offers a global indication of the places people lie awake at hours when most are sleeping. It’s an incomplete picture, because the data is based on tweets, and access to Twitter varies by country for a number of reasons, from government-imposed censorship (Russia, China) to the unending ravages of colonialism (a lot of Africa). U.K.-based blinds manufacturer Hillarys, the company behind the project, designates a tiny digital point of light on a world map to represent Twitter users who have sent messages about not being able to sleep. The more people who are staring at their screens and tweeting when they should be sleeping—the exact opposite of the way to cure insomnia—the more bathed in light an area of the map becomes.

As Breena Kerr notes on Vice’s Tonic, the United States has the most sleep-deprived folks of the countries tracked, at least according to Twitter data. There also seems to be some clear overlap between sleeplessness and having voted against Trump. In the center of the country, the dots of light are scattered across the landscape, some with a fair amount of distance between them. Look out at the edges of the country, though, and you’ll notice more points of light that are densely packed, forming brightly lit patches.

There are probably other contributing factors to the sleep gaps the map depicts. As Kerr points out, “60 percent of Americans in rural areas use social media, compared with 71 percent in suburban areas and 69 percent in urban areas, according to the Pew Research Center’s data.” There’s also likely a cultural difference: “late-night” towns like New York, where everything’s open later and the pace of life is hectic, probably have more people up and tweeting than a sleepier town where things shut down by 9pm. But as Kerr notes, Trump anxiety—which is more present in places that didn’t vote for the president—definitely includes sleeplessness.

“Victims of Trump-induced anxiety describe nightmares, insomnia, digestive problems, and headaches,” Slate’s Michelle Goldberg wrote back in September. “Therapists find themselves helping their patients through a process that feels less like an election than a national nervous breakdown.”

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Trump snaps at Jim Acosta for reminding him of coronavirus death toll: ‘Fake news CNN’

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President Donald Trump on Monday snapped at CNN's Jim Acosta when he reminded the president that the novel coronavirus so far has killed 155,000 Americans.

During a question-and-answer session with reporters, the president boasted that the United States had done an "amazing" job at handling the COVID-19 pandemic, at which point Acosta interrupted him and tried to ask him about the 155,000 people who have died from the disease in just five months.

"The U.S. has so many deaths," Acosta said.

"Hold it!" Trump replied.

"So many countries around the world..."

"Fake news CNN!" he said. "Hold it. We have done a great job in this country. We haven't been given enough -- not me, Vice President Pence, the task force -- have not been given the kind of credit."

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COVID-19 obituary blames Republicans for Texas man’s untimely end: ‘They blame his death on Trump’

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One family in Texas recently used their loved one’s obituary to criticize President Donald Trump and Texas Gov. Greg Abbott for allowing “needless” COVID-19 deaths.

David W. Nagy died alone in a hospital bed, leaving behind his "inconsolable wife."

"He suffered greatly from the ravages of the COVID-19 virus and the separation from his much loved family who were not allowed at his bedside," the obituary says.

"Family members believe David's death was needless," the obituary continues. "They blame his death and the deaths of all of the other innocent people, on Trump, Abbott and all the other politicians who did not take this pandemic seriously and were more concerned with their popularity and votes than lives."

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Pennsylvania teen issues violent threat to defend friend from racism accusation: ‘I can show you what a real hate crime is’

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A Pennsylvania man was charged with making terroristic threats after a Black teenager accused his friend of being racist.

A friend of Andrew Smith, of Chalfont, attacked a Central Bucks West High School student by name and used racial slurs, reported the Bucks County Courier Times.

Smith's friend, who has not been charged, lashed out at the teen for supporting the Black Lives Matter movement and said her views “make me wanna commit a black hate crime,” according to The Philadelphia Inquirer.

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