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Julia Louis-Dreyfus to receive Mark Twain Prize for humor

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“Veep” and “Seinfeld” star Julia Louis-Dreyfus will be awarded the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor, one of the United States’ top artistic honors, organizers said on Wednesday.

Louis-Dreyfus, 57, who is recovering from treatment for breast cancer, will receive the annual award handed out by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts at a ceremony on Oct. 21 in Washington. The event will be televised.

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“Over four decades, her wildly original characters and her gift for physical comedy have left us in stitches,” Kennedy Center President Deborah Rutter said in a statement.

The actress rose to prominence playing intelligent neurotic Elaine Benes in the top-rated 1990s comedy TV series “Seinfeld.”

“Merely to join the list of distinguished recipients of this award would be honor enough, but, as a student of both American history and literature, the fact that Mr. Twain himself will be presenting the award to me in person is particularly gratifying,” Louis-Dreyfus said in a statement.

She has won a record six consecutive Emmy Awards for best actress in a comedy series for her portrayal of the cynical, incompetent politician Selina Meyer in HBO political satire “Veep.”

The acclaimed series is on hold while Louis-Dreyfus recuperates from cancer treatment. Its seventh and final season is expected to begin production in August and premiere in 2019.

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Louis-Dreyfus has captured nearly all of the top honors in American television, including a record nine Screen Actors Guild Awards, a Golden Globe Award and a Peabody Award.
Past recipients of the Mark Twain Prize include David Letterman, Tina Fey, Lily Tomlin and Steve Martin.

Reporting by Eric Kelsey; editing by Jonathan Oatis

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Lindsey Graham explodes in anger demanding to know why FBI ‘didn’t tell Trump’ his campaign was under investigation

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Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham exploded in anger as he questioned Inspector General Michael Horowitz, demanding to know why the FBI did not notify then-candidate Donald Trump and his campaign in 2016 that they were the subjects of a counterintelligence investigation to determine how Russia was attacking the U.S. and if any members of the Trump campaign were involved.

Chairman Graham appeared to ignore all the signs that Donald Trump and his campaign may have been conspiring with Russia to win the 2016 presidential election, including Trump’s infamous “Russia, if you’re listening” remarks.

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DOJ inspector general ‘surprised’ after Bill Barr challenged his investigation’s conclusions

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Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz told the Senate Intelligence Committee on Wednesday that he was surprised that Attorney General Bill Barr and U.S. Attorney John Durham have been publicly challenging the conclusions of his lengthy investigation into the origins of the FBI's probe into contacts between the Trump campaign and Russian agents.

When asked by Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) to comment on Barr and Durham's remarks on his investigation, Horowitz said he saw no basis for them to challenge his findings.

"I was surprised by the statement," he said. "I didn't necessarily know it was going to be released on Monday. We did meet with Mr. Durham, as I mentioned... We did discuss the opening issue. He said he did not necessarily agree with our conclusion about the opening of a full counterintelligence investigation, which is what this was."

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University of Phoenix to cancel $141 million in student debt after getting busted for deceptive ads

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According to the Associated Press, the University of Phoenix and its parent company will pay out $50 million in cash and cancel $141 million in student debt in response to allegations of deceptive advertising.

The settlement is in regards to a 2012 ad campaign the university pushed that promoted partnerships with companies including Microsoft, Twitter and Adobe, claiming that the university partnered with the companies to create job opportunities for students.

In reality, no such partnerships existed.

“Students making important decisions about their education need the facts, not fantasy job opportunities that do not exist," Andrew Smith, director of the Federal Trade Commission's Bureau of Consumer Protection, told the AP.

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