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Stacey Abrams wins Georgia primary as women across the US move forward to general elections

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Democratic voters in Georgia nominated a candidate on Tuesday who could make history as the first African-American female governor in the United States.

Stacey Abrams won her party’s nomination in a closely watched race showcasing divergent Democratic strategies on how to win in a Republican-dominated southern state.

She was among a slate candidates being selected by voters in four states to advance to the November midterm elections. In Texas and Kentucky, contests were also pushing women to the forefront of the fight for the House of Representatives, where Democrats need to wrest 23 seats from Republicans to gain control. Several races were also a referendum on long-simmering divisions within the Democratic party.

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Kentucky Democrats picked a female former Marine fighter pilot, Amy McGrath, in a snub to the party establishment for a U.S. House seat district that Democrats hope to put into play.

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) had promoted the candidacy of Lexington Mayor Jim Gray, who conceded the race and urged his supporters to support McGrath.

McGrath will face U.S. Representative Andy Barr, the Republican incumbent, in November.

Record numbers of women are running across the nation, especially on the Democratic ticket, in the first election since Republican President Donald Trump won the White House in 2016.

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In Georgia, Abrams became the first black female in the United States to win a major party’s nomination for governor, according to the Gender Watch project, a nonpartisan group tracking elections.

Reporting by Letitia Stein in Detroit; Editing by G Crosse and Sandra Maler

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The pro-Trump Super PAC at the center of the Ukraine scandal has faced multiple campaign finance complaints

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ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for The Big Story newsletter to receive stories like this one in your inbox.

Last year, a Department of Defense contractor quietly donated half a million dollars to a group supporting President Donald Trump’s reelection.

Once a watchdog organization noticed it, the contribution raised an alarm. Federal contractors are not allowed to donate to political entities. And groups are required by law to examine all donations for potential legal issues. If they discover that a contractor has made a contribution, the money has to be returned.

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Trump campaign fundraises off Mulvaney’s disastrous tirade by selling ‘Get Over It’ t-shirts

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White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney's disastrous tirade on Thursday, in which he admitted there was a quid-pro-quo for delivering aid to Ukraine and told reporters to "get over it," has now become a fundraising pitch for President Donald Trump's reelection campaign.

Per BuzzFeed News' Miriam Elder, the Trump campaign on Friday started selling t-shirts that read "Get Over It" in which the "O" on the shirt is topped by a cartoon of President Donald Trump's hair.

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Trump is flailing as his customary ‘brazen it out’ strategy fails to halt the Ukraine scandal

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It's easy to see why acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney decided it was time to move to the "brazen it out" phase of the administration's attempts to shut down Donald Trump's Ukraine scandal. The nose-thumbing method of PR has been highly effective for Trump since his campaign days, allowing him to steal the nickname "Teflon Don" from its original owner, infamous mafioso John Gotti. (Whose eventual fate — dying in prison — should, one hopes, give the current Teflon Don the night sweats.)

This article was originally published at Salon

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