Quantcast
Connect with us

Ex-CIA director suspects Trump repeated Putin’s anti-NATO talking points on Fox News

Published

on

Ret. Gen. Michael Hayden on Wednesday said it was likely that President Donald Trump’s bizarre remarks about the nation of Montenegro during a Fox News interview came directly from Russian President Vladimir Putin’s talking points.

During a CNN interview, host Alisyn Camerota played Hayden a clip of Trump discussing NATO member Montenegro with Fox News host Tucker Carlson in which he described the tiny nation as “very aggressive” and that could spark “World War III” if they decided to attack Russia.

ADVERTISEMENT

Hayden, a former CIA director, said Trump’s words about Montenegro sounded suspiciously like Russian propaganda used to describe the country.

“I would not be at all surprised that what you heard the president say to Tucker Carlson there last night is derived from what Vladimir Putin told him during the one-on-one discussions in Helsinki,” Hayden said.

“That’s troubling,” Camerota said. “How will we know what happened in those one-on-one discussions?”

“I don’t know,” Hayden admitted.

Elsewhere in the segment, Hayden also criticized Trump for not understanding that NATO is most effective if its foes believe that an attack on one NATO country is an attack on all NATO countries.

ADVERTISEMENT

“The president just expressed his doubt and took on the core requirement of the North Atlantic Treaty,” he said.

Watch the video below.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

CNN

Trump is ‘asleep at the switch’ in his bunker while America needs a unifying voice: CNN’s Keith Boykin

Published

on

On CNN Monday, former Bill Clinton staffer and CNN commentator Keith Boykin laid out the extent of President Donald Trump's failure in a moment of national crisis.

"Keith, do you feel this time at all may be different as far as a real outcome?" asked anchor Brooke Baldwin.

"I definitely feel this is different," said Boykin. "Think about the conditions that we're in right now. We have 41 million people who don't have jobs. You have 100,000 people who have died from the coronavirus pandemic, disproportionally black and brown people, and people outraged about the shooting and killing and murders of black men and women and the George Floyd incident and Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery, where people have no place to go, nothing to do. No school or jobs to go to. No distractions. It is not like the typical protest in the past that could go back to work or class. They could spend all summer just being upset unless there is a substantive change."

Continue Reading

CNN

Trump is ‘capable of reading’ a unifying message — but it’s doubtful he’ll mean it: Atlanta mayor

Published

on

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms on Monday expressed little confidence that President Donald Trump could unify the nation at a time when the United States faces a triple threat of a recession, a pandemic, and civil unrest.

During an interview on CNN, host Alisyn Camerota asked Bottoms about actions Trump could possibly take to calm nerves and bring the country together.

"What about the debate that we are told is going on in the White House, as to whether or not the president should at this moment make some sort of national statement and call for unity?" she asked. "Would you like to see that?"

Continue Reading
 

CNN

Racist cops, COVID-19 and unemployment are sending black Americans into ‘despair’: Charles Blow

Published

on

The multiple crises hitting the United States at the moment are hitting the black community particularly hard, and New York Times columnist Charles Blow said on Monday that it's sending people into deep despair.

While appearing on CNN, Blow said that the nationwide protests that have erupted in the wake of George Floyd's killing last week were about much more than the death of just one man.

"You add on top of that all the other conditions, which you spoke before, about this happening in the middle of a pandemic," he said. "Everybody's at home. 40 million people have filed for unemployment. They don't know where their next check is coming from... The idea that [unemployment] is disproportionately affecting black people, that COVID is disproportionately affecting black people that, police brutality is disproportionately affecting black people, it's all part of the despair."

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image