Quantcast
Connect with us

Russian officials and state media mock ‘weak’ GOP senators after Moscow visit

Published

on

Russian broadcasters mocked the Republican lawmakers who visited Moscow over the Fourth of July holiday and gloated about the Kremlin’s role in electing President Donald Trump.

Seven U.S. senators and one congresswoman — Sens. Steve Daines (R-MT), John Hoeven (R-ND), Ron Johnson (R-WI), John Kennedy (R-LA), Jerry Moran (R-KS), Richard Shelby (R-AL), John Thune (R-SD) and Rep. Kay Granger (R-TX) — traveled to Russia for closed-door meetings with high-ranking Kremlin officials.

ADVERTISEMENT

Shelby led the delegation on tours of St. Petersburg and Moscow, where they met with Russia’s foreign minister and parliamentarians, but did not meet with Russian president Vladimir Putin, as they’d hoped.

The trip was planned months ago, before Trump’s White House invitation to Putin was shifted instead to a private one-on-one meeting between the two presidents.

“We know that we need a new beginning, that we can go over recriminations on both sides for days in,” Shelby said at the Federation Council, Russia’s upper house of parliament. “But I believe Russia and the United States and the world will be a lot better off if we improve our relationship.”

The Alabama Republican dismissed the widespread agreement among U.S. intelligence and law enforcement agencies that the Kremlin interfered in the 2016 election, but Russian TV hosts disagreed.

ADVERTISEMENT

“What trouble did we cause?” one Russian TV analyst said last week, before the senators arrived. “We just elected Trump, that’s all.”

The GOP lawmakers started their trip last weekend in St. Petersburg, where they were welcomed by Gov. Georgy Poltavchenko, a former KGB officer and Putin ally, and then met Lavrov and former Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak, whose contacts with Trump campaign officials ahead of the election have been eyed by special counsel Robert Mueller.

The all-Republican delegation also met with Vyacheslav Volodin, speaker of the Duma house of parliament, and Konstantin Kosachyov, head of the foreign relations committee — who each have been sanctioned by the U.S. for their ties to Putin.

ADVERTISEMENT

Daines insisted the GOP lawmakers had been tough on Russia.

“We sent a very strong message and a direct message to the Russian government,” Daines told Fox News.

The Montana Republican, who returned from the trip early to join Trump at a campaign rally in his home state, said the lawmakers asked Russia not to interfere in U.S. elections, respect Ukraine’s sovereignty, work alongside the U.S. for peace in Syria, and follow obligations under nuclear arms treaties.

ADVERTISEMENT

Kislyak, who is now a member of Russia’s upper house of parliament, wasn’t impressed.

“We heard things we’d heard before, and I think our guests heard rather clearly and distinctly an answer that they already knew — we don’t interfere in American elections,” he said.

Trump last week sided with Putin on whether Russia interfered in the election he won, and he praised the Russian president to supporters in Montana.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Putin is fine, he’s fine,” Trump said. “We are all fine, we’re all people.”

Russian broadcasters mocked the Republican lawmakers as “weak,” saying their tough talk changed after arriving in Moscow.

“We need to look down at them and say: You came because you needed to, not because we did,” said Russian military expert Igor Korotchenko on state-run television.

Duma member Vyacheslav Nikonov said the meeting with the Republican lawmakers was “one of the easiest ones in my life.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Hat tip to Russian media analyst Julia Davis for her information.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Republicans are getting nervous about Trump’s chances in Wisconsin: ‘There’s no way he’s gaining supporters’

Published

on

President Donald Trump's election chances, once again, will likely hinge on Wisconsin's suburbs -- but he can't expect a "free ride."

Hillary Clinton infamously lost the crucial state after failing to campaign there in the waning days before the 2016 election, but some GOP voters there are souring on the president, reported Politico.

“For the president to win Wisconsin again, he’s not going to have the free ride he had last time,” said Brandon Scholz, former executive director of the Wisconsin Republican Party. "He’s not going to have Hillary Clinton sitting on her hands “He’s going to have a completely engaged opposition party on the ground.”

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Covering up the corruption: GOP tries to block new Mike Pence investigation

Published

on

Vice President Mike Pence's trip to Ireland — or more precisely his curious stay at one of President Trump’s hotels — has prompted multiple congressional probes. But the Democrat-led oversight investigations have already drawn complaints and pushback from Trump’s loudest Republican defenders on Capitol Hill, including the ranking member of the House Oversight Committee.

Democrats in both the House of Representatives and Senate have sent official letters of inquiry to the vice president’s office seeking specific information on the costs of Pence's recent stay at Trump International Golf Club in Doonbeg, Ireland. They have imposed a Sept. 19 deadline for the administration and the Trump Organization to turn over relevant documents. Democrats have raised concerns that Pence’s stay at Trump’s resort could have violated the emoluments clause in the Constitution. They’ve asked for details like the cost of the stay, Secret Service protection, and comparable rates for hotels nearby as well as across the country in Dublin, where Pence held meetings with Irish officials and business leaders.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Trump’s Electoral College win was no fluke — and is likely to happen again: new study

Published

on

Republicans are expected to win 65 percent of close presidential races in which they lose the popular vote as a result of the Electoral College and the blue-state concentration of Democrats, according to a new working paper by the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin looked at the probability of “inversions” in presidential elections, where the popular-vote winner loses the electoral vote. These inversions happened in 2000 and 2016 and twice in the 1800s, meaning that the candidate with the most votes has lost 8 percent of the time in the last 200 years.

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image