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Teacher gently schools young Trump supporter who’s unable to name anything he likes about the president

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A St. Louis-area teacher challenged a teenager to defend his support for President Donald Trump — and he ends up finding more to criticize than to praise.

Two women and the Trump supporter amicably debated the president during his visit Thursday to Granite City, Illinois, in a video recorded by a St. Louis Post-Dispatch reporter.

Neither woman or the boy, who is holding a hand-lettered “we love Trump/Pence” sign and says he’s 17 years old, are identified by the reporter, who describes one woman as a teacher.

“Use your right to vote, vote in every election, and be involved and be concerned, and pay attention,” the teacher says. “Learn something … take that opportunity.”

The teen insists that he has been, and he admits there are things about Trump that he does not like.

“I do not like Trump as a person,” he says. “He says things about women that I do not appreciate. I personally do not think that Trump is a racist person — do you think he’s racist?”

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An onlooker says she does think the president is racist, and the teacher asks him to defend Trump on moral grounds.

“Can you put things of conscience aside?” she says. “When a lie is proven — any candidate — and there have been felons that have been running for office. We are in a climate where lying is becoming the norm, and it’s terrifying.”

The teen agrees “it’s really bad,” and the teacher explains that democratic institutions have already been weakened under Trump.

“Institutions that people have relied on and had faith in for many, many years — the Justice Department, the FBI — those are all being marginalized and compromised,” the teacher says.

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She complains that Twitter is not even enforcing its own rules by allowing Trump’s attacks on institutions and individuals, and the teen agrees he doesn’t like the president’s tweets.

“If I posted the things he posts, they would ban me, because I’m not famous and I’m not a world leader,” she says. “They say it’s okay because he’s a world leader.

The encounter opens with the teen attempting to explain socialism, and the effort embarrasses an onlooker.

“Socialism is where — it’s stuff like government-controlled,” the teen says, as the onlooker shakes her head in dismay.

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“Bless his heart,” she says. “He just does not know, does he? Bless his heart.”

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A historian explains why 2019 marks the beginning of the next 74-year cycle of American history

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A century ago, historian Arthur Schlesinger, Sr. argued that history occurs in cycles. His son, Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., furthered this theory in his own scholarship. As I reflect on Schlesinger’s work and the history of the United States, it seems clear to me that American history has three 74-year-long cycles. America has had four major crisis turning points, each 74 years apart, from the time of the Constitutional Convention of 1787 to today.

The first such crisis occurred when the Founding Fathers met in Philadelphia in 1787 to face the reality that the government created by the Articles of Confederation was failing. There was a dire need for a new Constitution and a guarantee of a Bill of Rights to save the American Republic. The founding fathers, under the leadership of George Washington, were equal to the task and the American experiment successfully survived the crisis.

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Self-preservation fuels the Democratic base’s lurch to the left — before the rich take it all

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In 2016 all the corporate news media outlets, NPR included, predicted that Trump would lose. They just did not recognize the discontent in America’s rust belt because the economic dislocation that had, and continues to define life there, was just not part of their personal frame of reference.

They thought the country was several years into a recovery and the national aggregate unemployment data they had commissioned confirmed it. But nobody lives or votes in the aggregate. And it wasn’t until Trump flipped the 200 counties that Obama had carried twice, that the corporate news media started paying some attention.

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Experts discuss the distorted impeachment debate at a propaganda forum — and how real debate can untangle it

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“Would you be upset if the Democratic nominee called on China to help in the next presidential election?” That’s the concrete question we should ask ourselves about Robert Mueller's report and the issue of impeachment, according to University of California, Santa Cruz, social psychologist Anthony Pratkanis, speaking at a recent Zócalo Public Square event, “Is Propaganda Keeping Americans From Thinking for Themselves?

This was a week before President Trump’s interview with George Stephanopoulos of ABC News, apparently welcoming foreign interference in the 2020 election. Impeachment wasn’t the ostensible subject of the event — which also featured Texas A&M historian of rhetoric Jennifer Mercieca and UCLA marketing scholar and psychologist Hal Hershfield — but it was never far from mind.

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