Quantcast
Connect with us

Ex-Trump executive explains why Mueller is scary enough to make the president’s oldest allies flip on him

Published

on

As President Donald Trump is bemoaning the prosecutorial practice of “flipping” criminals to testify against their superiors, it appears many of his old associates are planning to do exactly that.

Michael Cohen, Trump’s former lawyer, pleaded guilty this week to eight counts of criminal activity and signaled his willingness to testify against the president. After that, it was reported in multiple outlets that David Pecker, Trump’s longtime ally at the top of American Media Inc., and the former CFO of the Trump Organization, Allen Weisselberg, have both been given immunity deals — suggesting they may turn on the president as well.

ADVERTISEMENT

Barbara Res, a former executive at the Trump Organization, discussed the implications of these developments Friday afternoon on CNN.

“He was an executive vice president like myself,” she said, referring to Weisselberg. “I didn’t think that he was so much in the inner circle with Donald. I think he was more, you know, an everyday kind of, pay the bills, see the payroll, that kind of thing.”

She continued: “Over time it is very possible that he may have changed his position. When I heard that he was being granted immunity, my knee-jerk was: Immunity for what? I didn’t think that Allen would necessarily have committed a crime that he could be charged with. But now I realize that — as scary as Trump is — Mueller is scarier. And I think that Allen probably said, ‘I will talk,’ or his lawyers probably advised him, but, ‘You have to grant me immunity just in case there is something that you think I may have done wrong that you can charge me with.’ That would be my gut on it.”

Asked about how Trump would react to this news, Res said: “He may have known it since it happened a while ago. But as far as what he is thinking about these people turning on him, I think he is probably extremely angry, maybe a little surprised, although I don’t think he should be surprised.”

Watch the clip below:

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

CNN

‘There needs to be a prosecution’ of cop who killed George Floyd: CNN guest says ‘call it what it is’

Published

on

On CNN Wednesday, criminal defense attorney Joey Jackson walked through why the Minneapolis police officer responsible for George Floyd's suffocation death must be prosecuted.

"Bottom line, question here from looking at this, should the officer face charges?" asked host Erin Burnett.

"Erin, I don't think there is any question about that, and I think if you look at it, under any reasonable measure there needs to be a prosecution," said Jackson. "You know, when you look at issues of excessive force — and I know this comes with a lot of emotion, and it should because of the blatant nature of what occurred. But if you even look at it legally and forget about the emotion, you look and you see, was there an imminent fear that the officer was facing when he had his knee in the neck of Mr. Floyd? And the answer is resoundingly no. You look at the force he used, that is the officer, and you say is it proportionate to whatever threat was posed? The answer is no, you don't see any threat. You see a person detained and really not resisting at all."

Continue Reading

CNN

CNN’s John King astonished Trump keeps tweeting things that would get anyone else ‘fired in a snap’

Published

on

CNN's John King on Wednesday expressed shock that no one has been able to convince President Donald Trump to stop tweeting unfounded conspiracy theories about MSNBC host Joe Scarborough murdering a staffer 20 years ago.

During an interview with David Gergen, King said it was particularly jarring to see Trump, in the middle of a pandemic that has killed 100,000 Americans, to be tweeting things that "if I tweeted them, we would be fired in a snap."

Gergen then looked back at how past presidents have handled tragedies, and he said Trump pales in comparison to all of them.

"This should be a week of national mourning, to have 100,000 deaths, the number we'll reach in the next two or three days, and the country is saddened by that," he said. "Traditionally, presidents bring us together for occasions like this. They brought comfort, they met privately with the families of the victims and cheered people up... and here now, we have completely the opposite. It's very, very sad."

Continue Reading
 

CNN

‘Tempting fate and asking for trouble’: Dr. Fauci rips Ozark pool partiers for blowing off pandemic safety

Published

on

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, slammed the large crowds that gathered for a now-infamous pool party in Missouri over the weekend for blowing off social distancing guidelines.

During an interview with CNN's Jim Sciutto, Fauci was asked what he made of the people who were captured on video partying without keeping any distance or wearing any face masks.

"When you have situations in which you see that type of crowding, with no masks and people interacting, that's not prudent and that's inviting a situation that could get out of control," Fauci said. "So I keep -- when I get an opportunity to plead with people, understanding you do want to gradually do this, but don't start leapfrogging over the recommendations and guidelines because that's tempting fate and asking for trouble."

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image