Quantcast
Connect with us

Trump and Manafort are using the mafia’s favorite legal technique that could lead to a pardon: ex-federal prosecutors

Published

on

Despite efforts on the president’s part to distance himself from his former campaign manager, an analysis of a legal agreement between Donald Trump and Paul Manafort reveals that the two are using a common mob technique that could eventually lead to a pardon.

Earlier on Thursday, Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani revealed to Politico that the president and his former campaign manager have a joint-defense agreement that allows them to communicate in a manner that is protected by attorney-client privilege.

ADVERTISEMENT

“All during the investigation we have an open communication with them,” Giuliani told Politico. “Defense lawyers talk to each other all the time, where, as long as our clients authorize it, therefore we have a better idea of what’s going to happen. That’s very common.”

In an interview with The Atlantic, former federal prosecutor Elie Honig said those sorts of agreements are commonly used by the mafia to get their stories straight.

“These types of agreements are very common in mob and street-gang cases,” the ex-assistant U.S. attorney who prosecuted over 100 members and associates of La Costa Nostra told the magazine. “I’ve seen some joint-defense agreements with 20 participants … It enables and facilitates all defendants to get together and say, ‘Let’s get our ducks in a row.’”

“Strategically, it enables all the different defendants and targets in a case to get together, work out what they’re going to say, and get on the same page so as not to implicate each other,” he added.

ADVERTISEMENT

Former federal prosecutor Jeffrey Cramer told the Atlantic that the agreement signals that “both Trump and Manafort that their interests are aligned.” Patrick Cotter, another ex-prosecutor, said it’s “another way [for Manafort] to demonstrate his loyalty to Team Trump.”

Though Honig said Trump’s team must be wary of the appearance of a potential pardon being a means of obstructing justice, Cramer told the magazine the move is “not a bad roll of the dice” for Manafort.

“As we’ve seen from Trump’s past pardons, Manafort won’t need to wait on career prosecutors or the [White House’s] pardon office to make a recommendation,” the prosecutor added. “It’s really just about waiting on the president’s whim.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Read the entire report via The Atlantic.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Donald Trump is mirroring the career path of Vladimir Putin: Scientology doc maker Alex Gibney

Published

on

According to the director of the "Going Clear," the definitive documentary on Scientology, the rise of both Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin neatly mirror each other in the way that they have propelled themselves into office by using media manipulation as their most potent weapon.

As part of a discussion with the Daily Beast about his latest work, Citizen K, a look at the life of Russian dissident Mikhail Khodorkovsky, Alex Gibney said Putin's career trajectory became a major part of his story -- and he noticed extraordinary parallels with Trump.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Princeton historian delivers the definitive smackdown of Trump’s ‘insulting’ lynching tweet

Published

on

Princeton University History Professor Kevin Kruse on Tuesday delivered a thorough takedown of President Donald Trump's claim that House Democrats' impeachment inquiry represents a "lynching."

In calling the tweet "twelve different kinds of bullsh*t," Kruse began by discussing the constitutional mechanics of the impeachment process in the House that only require a bare majority of lawmakers to favor in order to advance. Concerns about due process in impeachment only come into play in the Senate, where the president is ensured a fair trial and where two-thirds of lawmakers are needed to convict the president and remove him from office.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

CNN panel busts Trump for ‘grotesque’ lynching comment in effort to create chaos before key impeachment hearing

Published

on

Moments after Donald Trump fired off a tweet calling his impending impeachment a "lynching" a CNN panel hammered the president for making the horrific comparison -- but also pointed out that the president's use of the word was timed for a very specific reason.

Admitting a reluctance to read Trump's tweets on the air, "New Day" host Alisyn Camerota nonetheless, recited the president's tweet, reading, "So some day, if a Democrat becomes President and the Republicans win the House, even by a tiny margin, they can impeach the President, without due process or fairness or any legal rights,” Trump tweeted. “All Republicans must remember what they are witnessing here – a lynching. But we will WIN!” with obvious disgust.

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1 and go ad-free.
close-image