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Chief Justice John Roberts orders new investigation into Brett Kavanaugh: Fox News

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White House Director of Strategic Communications and former lobbyist Mercedes Schlapp, Justice Brett Kavanaugh, and Brett Schlapp, head of the American Conservative Union lobbying organization, celebrating Kavanaugh's confirmation to the U.S. Supreme Court (Twitter).

Fox News personality Bret Baier on Wednesday reported that U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts has referred allegations of judicial misconduct claims against Justice Brett Kavanaugh to outside judges for investigation.

Judge Karen LeCraft Henderson, a George H.W. Bush nominee, forwarded more than a dozen misconduct complaints to the chief justice after determining they were substantive enough that they needed to be investigated by judges outside the DC Circuit Court of Appeals, where Kavanaugh was serving as a judge.

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“The situation is highly unusual, legal experts and several people familiar with the matter said,” The Washington Post explained on Saturday. “Never before has a Supreme Court nominee been poised to join the court while a fellow judge recommends that a series of misconduct claims against that nominee warrant review.”

Chief Justice Roberts had been sitting on the complaints for weeks, refusing action before Kavanaugh was confirmed and sworn in to the Supreme Court on Saturday.

“Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts is asking federal judges outside the beltway to investigate complaints over statements made by now-Justice Brett Kavanaugh during his contentious nomination,” Baier reported Wednesday.

“Roberts says he received the ethics complaints beginning September 20th, but did not act on referrals until today,” Baier added.

Watch (Roberts’ letter below video):

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Letter from Chief Justice Roberts Transferring Judicial Misconduct Complaints Filed Against Former Circuit Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Tenth Circuit


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The Arab uprisings were weakened by online fakes

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The Arab uprisings a decade ago were supercharged by online calls to join the protests -- but the internet was soon flooded with misinformation, weakening the region's cyber-activists.

When Tunisian dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali fled the country in January 2011, rumours and uncertainty created "panic and hysteria", said ex-activist and entrepreneur Houeida Anouar.

"January 14 was a horrible night, so traumatic," she said. "We heard gunfire, and a neighbour shouted 'hide yourselves, they're raping women'."

As pro-regime media pumped out misinformation, the flood of bogus news also spread to the internet, a space activists had long seen as a refuge from censorship and propaganda.

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Dr. Fauci warns of post-Thanksgiving COVID-19 surge in US

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The United States is the worst-affected country, with 266,074 Covid-19 deaths, and President Donald Trump's administration has issued conflicting messages on mask-wearing, travel and the danger posed by the virus.

"There almost certainly is going to be an uptick because of what has happened with the travel," Fauci told CNN's "State of the Union."

Travel surrounding Thursday's Thanksgiving holiday made this the busiest week in US airports since the pandemic began.

"We may see a surge upon a surge" in two or three weeks, Fauci added. "We don't want to frighten people, but that's the reality."

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Sidney Powell’s new election lawsuit cites election experts she won’t even name: legal expert

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President Donald Trump's former election lawyer, Sidney Powell, has filed her lawsuit in Georgia suing Gov. Brian Kemp (R-GA) for what she says is a fraudulent election.

But lawyer Mike Dunford explained that it doesn't exactly work that way. Reading through Powell's court document "Emergency Motion for Declaratory, Emergency, and Permanent Injunctive Relief and Memorandum in Support Thereof."

"If you want emergency relief it is very helpful to be as clear and concise as humanly possible," he explained. "Pointing the court back to your 100+ page complaint with its 29 exhibits isn't how that is best done. To put it very mildly."

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