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Ecuador will no longer intervene with UK for WikiLeaks Assange – foreign minister

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Ecuador does not plan to intervene with the British government on behalf of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in talks over his situation as an asylee in the South American country’s London embassy, Ecuador’s foreign minister said on Tuesday.

Foreign Minister José Valencia said in an interview with Reuters that Ecuador’s only responsibility was looking after Assange’s wellbeing, after the Australian national sued the country over new conditions placed on his asylum in the London embassy.

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“Ecuador has no responsibility to take any further steps,” Valencia said. “We are not Mr. Assange’s lawyers, nor are we representatives of the British government. This is a matter to be resolved between Assange and Great Britain.”

The UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office did not immediately respond to emails seeking comment after normal business hours.

Greg Barns, an Australian lawyer advising Assange, said in an email that “developments in the case in recent times” showed the need for Australia’s government to intervene to assist “one of its citizens who faces real danger.”

This position marks a departure from Ecuador’s previous practice of maintaining dialogue with British authorities over Assange’s situation since granting him asylum in 2012, when he took refuge in Ecuador’s London Embassy after British courts ordered his extradition to Sweden to face questioning in a sexual molestation case.

That case has since been dropped, but friends and supporters have said that Assange now fears he could be arrested and eventually extradited to the United States if he leaves the embassy.

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WikiLeaks, which published U.S. diplomatic and military secrets when Assange ran the operation, faces a U.S. grand jury investigation.

Valencia said he was “frustrated” by Assange’s decision to file suit in an Ecuadorean court last week over new terms of his asylum, which required him to pay for medical bills and telephone calls and to clean up after his pet cat.

“There is no obligation in international agreements for Ecuador to pay for things like Mr. Assange’s laundry,” he said.

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Ecuadorean President Lenin Moreno has said that asylum is not meant to be eternal, but he has expressed concern about the possibility that Assange may be extradited to the United States. Valencia said on Tuesday that he has not discussed Assange’s situation with the United States’ government.

Last December, Ecuador granted Assange Ecuadorean citizenship and sought to name him as a member of the country’s diplomatic mission in Britain and Russia, which could have assured him safe passage to leave the embassy. Britain denied the request.

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Reporting by Alexandra Valencia, Writing by Luc Cohen, Editing by Toni Reinhold and Michael Perry


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
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Ken Starr suggests Sondland’s testimony could prompt GOP to ‘make a trip to the White House’ and ask Trump to resign

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In the run-up to the release of Gordon Sondland's opening statement for this Wednesday's impeachment hearings, Fox News contributor Ken Starr suggested that Sondland's testimony could cause GOP senators to push for President Trump's resignation.

“The real issue is the senators are watching,” Starr said. “Are senators going to now say in light of what we hear today, it’s going to be a long day even with the ambassador alone, in light of what we have heard, ‘We need to make a trip down to the White House’?"

"That historic example set during the Nixon presidency," Starr continued. "From what I’ve been able to glean I don’t think that’s going to happen. But obviously what happens today could—has the potential to be a game-changer."

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‘Swear in Pence’: Bush ethics czar says Sondland testimony is ‘game over’ for Trump as president

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It is time for Republicans to dump President Donald Trump and swear-in Vice President Mike Pence, a top former Republican White House official declared on Wednesday.

Richard Painter, the former chief White House ethics lawyer in the George W. Bush administration, came to his conclusion after the blockbuster opening statement of Ambassador Gordon Sondland was released.

Sondland implicated Trump, Rudy Giuliani and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in a "quid pro quo" with Ukraine.

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‘Going to need a bigger police wagon’: Viewers stunned as Gordon Sondland exposes Trump’s ‘criminal syndicate’ on live TV

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Gordon Sondland walked into the history books Wednesday morning by delivering damning testimony explicitly implicating President Donald Trump in the Ukraine extortion scheme.

The EU ambassador flipped on the president and other top Trump administration officials -- including Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Secretary of Energy Rick Perry -- during a devastating opening statement that showed the scheme flowed directly from the White House.

The testimony seemed to catch Republican lawmakers off guard, and shocked and inspired social media users.

It seems like Sondland left out a few interesting details in his initial testimony!

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