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Trump says he wants ‘comprehensive’ FBI investigation of Brett Kavanaugh

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President Donald Trump said on Monday he wants the FBI to conduct a comprehensive investigation into sexual misconduct allegations against his Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, but said he did not want to see a “witch hunt.”

“I want them to do a very comprehensive investigation. Whatever that means, according to the senators and the Republicans and the Republican majority, I want them to do that,” Trump said at a White House news conference. “With that being said, I’d like it to go quickly.”

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Trump on Friday ordered the FBI to carry out an investigation lasting up to a week of the allegations against Kavanaugh, acting on a request from Senate Republican leaders who were pressed by moderate senators in Trump’s own party.

Christine Blasey Ford, a university professor from California, testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee last week that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in 1982 when they were both high school students in Maryland. Kavanaugh has denied her allegation, as well as sexual misconduct accusations by two other women.

Questions about the scope of the FBI investigation emerged over the weekend amid reports that Senate Republicans were working with the White House to contain the number of witnesses and the allegations to be investigated.

Democrats expressed concern on Sunday about reported efforts to stymie the probe, which comes after the Judiciary Committee approved Kavanaugh’s nomination on Friday before it goes to the full Senate for a final vote.

“It is up to me, but I’m instructing them (FBI) as per what I feel the Senate wants,” Trump said. “I want it to be quickly, because it’s unfair to the family and to the judge. It’s so unfair to his kids and his wife.”

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“We don’t want to go on a witch hunt, do we?” Trump asked.

The Republican president was sympathetic to Kavanaugh, saying the nominee has been treated unfairly and that he believes Kavanaugh did not lie about the extent of his drinking in high school and college during testimony before the Senate panel on Thursday.

Reporting by Steve Holland; Writing by Doina Chiacu; Editing by Tim Ahmann and Will Dunham

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NPR is still expanding the range of what authority sounds like after 50 years

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From its start half a century ago, National Public Radio heralded a new approach to the sound of radio in the United States.

NPR “would speak with many voices and many dialects,” according to “Purposes,” its founding document.

Written in 1970, this blueprint rang with emotional immediacy. NPR would go on the air for the first time a year later, on April 20, 1971.

NPR is sometimes mocked, perhaps most memorably in a 1998 “Saturday Night Live” sketch starring actor Alec Baldwin, for its staid sound production and its hosts’ carefully modulated vocal quality. But the nonprofit network’s commitment to including “many voices” hatched a small sonic revolution on the airwaves.

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Trump’s digestive system the butt of jokes after he argues it takes 10 to 15 times to flush the toilet

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President Donald Trump made a brazen claim about how many times it takes to flush a toilet that had people wondering about the commander-in-chief's experiences when sitting on his thrown.

"People are flushing toilets ten times, fifteen times -- as opposed to once," Trump claimed while arguing against water conservation efficiency standards.

Here's Trump saying that he's heard from many people complaining about "flushing toilets 10 times, 15 times." pic.twitter.com/75HXYcH4xq

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Edward Snowden: If I came back to the US, I would likely die in prison for telling the truth

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At Wednesday’s The Right Livelihood Awards, Amy Goodman interviewed Snowden in front of the award ceremony’s live audience via video link from Moscow.

The Right Livelihood Awards celebrated their 40th anniversary Wednesday at the historic Cirkus Arena in Stockholm, Sweden, where more than a thousand people gathered to celebrate this year’s four laureates: Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg; Chinese women’s rights lawyer Guo Jianmei, Brazilian indigenous leader Davi Kopenawa and the organization he co-founded, the Yanomami Hutukara Association; and Sahrawi human rights leader Aminatou Haidar, who has challenged the Moroccan occupation of Western Sahara for decades. The Right Livelihood Award is known as the “Alternative Nobel Prize.”

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