Quantcast
Connect with us

Manafort’s lawyers ‘repeatedly’ coordinated with Trump’s team about what he told Mueller: report

Published

on

Lawyers for former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort “repeatedly” briefed the president’s attorneys on what he told special counsel Robert Mueller.

The New York Times reported that Mueller’s team members were upset to learn about the “unusual arrangement” after Manafort began cooperating.

Trump’s attorney, former NYC mayor Rudy Giuliani, acknowledged the practice generally in an interview with the conservative Washington Examiner Tuesday and again to the Times.

ADVERTISEMENT

Speaking to the Times, Giuliani reportedly defended the setup “as a source of valuable insights into the special counsel’s inquiry and where it was headed,” the report noted.

He admitted that Manafort’s attorney Kevin Downing “hammered away” at the former campaign manager about what information he had on the infamous 2016 Trump Tower meeting between the campaign and several Russians who promised “dirt” on Hillary Clinton.

The information he got from Downing about prosecutors’ questions for Manafort has since been used to attack Mueller, the report noted.

Giuliani also accused Andrew Weissmann, the prosecutor overseeing Manafort’s investigation, of keeping the former campaign manager in solitary confinement to coerce him to lie about Trump.

The report noted that detention officials — and not prosecutors — make the decisions about who goes into solitary. Manafort’s allies, the Times added, said he is there for his own safety.

ADVERTISEMENT

Mueller, Giuliani said, “wants Manafort to incriminate Trump” — a comment echoing those he made in the Examiner interview when he claimed the special counsel’s “zeal to get” the president resulted in Manafort lying to prosecutors.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘We can’t control that price’: Trump HHS secretary won’t promise a coronavirus vaccine will be affordable for all

Published

on

As the coronavirus quickly marches toward officially becoming a pandemic, the Trump administration is working hard to give the appearance they are managing the crisis. On Wednesday Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar repeated President Donald Trump's claim that a vaccine for the deadly, quick-spreading virus would be ready soon. Trump had actually appeared to suggest "very soon," which is false.

But soon or very soon, it won't be either for everyone.

Experts agree a coronavirus vaccine won't be ready for the general population more than a year. And while many would assume that would mean it would be available for everyone, HHS Secretary Azar has something different in mind.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump endorsed a risky antidepressant for veterans — and lawmakers want to know if his Mar-a-Lago pals had a stake in the drugmaker

Published

on

House Democrats are expanding their investigation of outside influence at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, examining whether a push to use a new antidepressant from Johnson & Johnson was advanced by a group of unofficial advisers who convened at Mar-a-Lago, President Donald Trump’s private club.

The chairmen of the House veterans affairs and oversight committees sent letters last week asking for emails and financial records from the three advisers, Marvel Entertainment chairman Ike Perlmutter, physician Bruce Moskowitz and lawyer Marc Sherman. The Democrats are seeking, among other documents, any communications the men had with Johnson & Johnson and financial records showing whether they had any stake in the company.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Republican response to potential pandemic aims at protecting Trump with cowardice, hypocrisy and outright lies

Published

on

The last time a deadly virus spread quickly across continents, Republicans in Congress ramped up xenophobic rhetoric to fear-monger ahead of the 2014 midterm elections. Echoing Donald Trump, who at the time hosted a weekly "Fox & Friends," Republicans called for a travel ban and spread misinformation. "[President] Obama should apologize to the American people & resign!" Trump tweeted in October of 2014. Public polls right before the midterm elections showed that nearly 80% of Republicans thought the U.S. government should quarantine people who had recently been in a West African country with a major Ebola outbreak and nearly 50% worried they would be exposed to the Ebola virus. It was a catastrophic election for Democrats, with Republicans winning nine Senate seats and 13 House seats.

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image