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Trump whines about the ‘dark days’ of the recession in Fox News op-ed — but doesn’t mention recent acts of terrorism

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In a Fox News op-ed, President Donald Trump touted job growth and a fear of the “dark days” of the recession as reasons people should vote for GOP candidates — but failed to mention the multiple acts of far-right domestic terrorism that took place in the US in recent weeks.

“For many Americans, the Great Recession brought dark days we will never forget – and never want to repeat,” Trump began in the editorial published Monday afternoon on the network’s website.

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He went on to write that “thanks to Republican leadership,” Americans finally have “hope.”

Trump touted the 250,000 jobs added to the economy “in the last month alone.”

He did not mention that in October, a Floridian who is obsessed with him allegedly sent pipe bombs to multiple prominent Democrats and a man who raved online about the “migrant caravan” the president keeps bringing up shot and killed 11 people in a Pittsburgh synagogue.

“African-Americans, Hispanic-Americans, and Asian-Americans have the best job prospects in history,” the president wrote. “The employment outlook for women is the best in more than 65 years.”

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After criticizing Democrats and claiming they would “take a giant wrecking ball to your economy and your future” if they gain majorities in Congress, the president implored readers to vote for the GOP.

“With your vote, we will keep lifting millions of our citizens from welfare to work, dependence to independence, and poverty to prosperity,” Trump concluded. “And together, we will build a future of safety, security, prosperity, and freedom for all our citizens.”

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‘The president got his head handed to him’: CNN panel points out GOP is fleeing Trump after Syria vote

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A CNN panel discussion on Donald Trump's very bad Wednesday turned to a House vote that saw Republicans joining with Democrats en masse in condemning the president's actions in Syria, with the panelists agreeing it is bad sign for Trump's future.

Speaking with hosts John Berman and Alisyn Camerota, CNN regulars Jeffrey Toobin and Dana Bash said Trump is facing big problems as impeachment looms.

According to Bash, a big part of Trump's bad day was word of his "meltdown" on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) spreading to congressional lawmakers on both sides of the aisle.

As she noted the now-famous picture of Pelosi confronting the president, Bash explained, "It's hard to see how that picture shows anything other than her literally and figuratively standing up to the president, particularly after what we now are told from people on both sides of the aisle who were in that room happened where the president was, again to use his words, 'rude to her'"

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‘Wonder who wrote this nice tweet’: Trump offers surprisingly ‘warm condolences’ to Cummings family

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President Donald Trump offered his "warmest condolences" to the family of Rep. Elijah Cummings, who died at 68 -- but many had doubts about who wrote that message.

The president had frequently attacked Cummings, who commanded respect and admiration from Democrats and Republicans alike, and social media users had been waiting to see Trump's reaction to the Maryland Democrat's passing.

Trump extended a message to the lawmaker's family and friends, and said that Cummings' voice would be nearly impossible to replace.

"My warmest condolences to the family and many friends of Congressman Elijah Cummings," Trump tweeted. "I got to see first hand the strength, passion and wisdom of this highly respected political leader. His work and voice on so many fronts will be very hard, if not impossible, to replace!"

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The Trump murder video is no joke: It’s an encouragement to ramp up the violence

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Donald Trump is not a “friendly fascist.” Unlike Ronald Reagan, the prototype for that concept, Trump does not pretend to be harmless. He does not offer up fake smiles and a cheerful nature, or display empathy and human concern for others, feigned or otherwise.

This article first appeared in Salon.

Donald Trump is direct, obvious and public in his threats against democracy, the Constitution and the rule of law. Trump and his movement are working to destroy America’s multiracial democracy through appeals to a mythic past that will “Make America Great Again.” In practice this means undoing all the social progress and democratic reforms of the last century or more and returning to a society where white people — rich white male Christians, in particular — are fully in control over all aspects of American society for all time.

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