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Here’s how ‘the Sopranos’ may have predicted Donald Trump’s rise to the presidency

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The author of a new book analyzing The Sopranos revealed that the show may have predicted Donald Trump’s rise to the presidency.

Truthdig’s Jacob Sugarman reported that the circumstances at the series much-hyped finale were oddly prescient.

In the final episode, patriarch Tony Soprano’s son AJ announces that he’s going to fight in Afghanistan with the Army in hopes of ultimately getting his trained as a helicopter pilot and then “afterwards go to work for Trump or somebody.”

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The war in Afghanistan is still on, the report noted, and “Donald Trump has improbably ascended to the White House, his family’s criminal undertakings offering their own source of fascination for the American public.”

Matt Zoller, co-writer of a new book critically re-examining the seminal series titled “The Sopranos Sessions,” told Truthdig that the show’s core is more alive in America in 2019 than it was when the show debuted 20 years ago.

“I think the thematic heart of the show—corruption, consumption and waste—are subjects that are on people’s minds to a far greater degree now than they were in the late ’90s,” Zoller said. “And I hate to be so blunt, but we have a kind of gangster president.”

The book’s co-writer told Sugarman that Trump would not even have been a Tony Soprano, but rather the type of guy the mafia patriarch would have killed.

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“When I first heard Donald Trump announcing his presidency—the way he was talking and the way he was acting like a tough guy, implying that he could have people beaten up, or legally crushed, and making it clear that if you were loyal to him he loved you—he sounded like one of the two-bit gangsters Tony would end up killing before the end of the season, simply because he was too loud and too stupid to be allowed to live,” Zoller said.

The writer noted that things have gotten increasingly worse for the United States since the era that the show debuted in came and went — and that he’s “stunned that we didn’t have somebody like Trump in charge of the country sooner.”

“I look at that guy, and I feel like I’m seeing what we actually are and never wanted to admit,” Zoller said. “And I think, as a country, we need to spend some quality time with [Soprano’s psychiatrist] Dr. Melfi and take a good, hard look at ourselves.”

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Read the entire interview via Truthdig.


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‘Morrison in the USA sucking up to Trump’: Aussies furious to see prime minister campaigning for Trump

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President Donald Trump and Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison appeared at a rally in Ohio Sunday, prompting Aussies to complain that it's unacceptable for their leader to be campaigning for Trump.

Trump invited himself to a Houston, Texas rally with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, where he tried to campaign for the U.S. president with Indian-American voters. Sadly, however, nearly 80 percent of Indian-American voters cast their ballots for Hillary Clinton in 2016.

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Republicans love the Constitution — until it applies to them: Conservative columnist

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Conservative Washington Post columnist Max Boot unleashed on President Donald Trump's latest scandal he's calling Ukraine-gate. But when it comes to Republicans, he called them outright complicit.

In his Sunday column, Boot noted that a mob boss doesn't have to overtly say “pay up, or we will destroy your store” to be guilty of extortion. In Trump's case, he tends to say things in a way that it is understood what he wants people to do, according to former "fixer" Michael Cohen.

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Hate for Trump sets new record of Americans who can’t stand a president

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A new poll shows a record number of Americans can't stand the president of the United States.

According to the most recent NBC News/Wall Street Journal public opinion poll, an astounding 69 percent of Americans don't like Trump personally.

During the early 2000s, President George W. Bush enjoyed the benefit of Americans finding him likable and wanting to "have a beer" with the sober leader. That measure of "likability" has been a kind of inspiration for political leaders searching for voters based not on issues but on personality.

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