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Mulvaney keeping ‘acting’ as part of chief of staff title so he can bail on Trump if ‘things go south’: White House source

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In an examination into how “acting” White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney is adapting to his new job serving Donald Trump, an administration insider claimed Mulvaney is hanging onto “acting” attached to his official title so he can quickly step aside without suffering the ignominy of having the president fire him.

According to Politico, Mulvaney is forging ahead with installing personal loyalists in White House jobs to assist him after taking over for ousted Chief of Staff John Kelly who left under a cloud of recriminations and chaos at the White House.

Politico reports, “While it’s not surprising for any new chief of staff to install people he knows and trusts in top jobs, administration officials say, Mulvaney’s latest moves illustrate the extent to which he is settling into his new job despite its temporary-seeming title.”

According to a Republican source with close ties to the Oval Office, Mulvaney is in no hurry to drop “acting” from his title because it gives him a graceful “out” if his relationship with the volatile Trump takes a turn for the worse.

“By keeping the ‘acting’ title, he gives himself an out in case things go south,” the anonymous source relayed. “He can say he was only the acting chief, if his relationship with the president sours in six months. Then, he won’t be fired.”

The report goes on to state that, by placing so many of his people in the White House, Mulvaney may be making it harder for Trump to oust him like he has his two previous chiefs of staff: Kelly and former RNC head Reince Priebus.

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“The hiring moves could make it harder for the White House to once again swap in a new chief of staff. In Trump’s two years in office, he went through two chiefs of staff before landing on this third. Reince Priebus, who first held the role, lasted only six months. His replacement, Kelly, made it to 18 months, but spent much of that time fighting off speculation about his job security and trying to manage the White House’s infighting, with constant reports that he and the president weren’t getting along,” Politico reports, before adding, “With roughly half a dozen Mulvaney acolytes in place, ousting the acting chief of staff would raise even more questions about staff churn in an administration already known for high turnover.”

You can read more about the changes Mulvaney is bringing to the White House here.

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2020 Election

New 2020 poll shows Trump trailing all Democrats — some by double-digits

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President Donald Trump trails all of his Democratic rivals in hypothetical matchups of the 2020 presidential race, according to the result of a new poll released Tuesday.

This article originally appeared on Salon.

The survey, conducted by Emerson Polling, found that the president lags behind former vice president Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., by 10 points nationally — 45 percent to 55 percent. He also trails Sen. Elizabeth Warren by six points — 47 percent to 53 percent —and Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., and South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg by four points — 48 percent to 52 percent.

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Beto O’Rourke’s ‘war tax’ policy proposal is straight out of ‘Starship Troopers’

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Amid an overcrowded Democratic presidential candidate field, it's hard to distinguish yourself from the pack if you don't slot easily into the scale that runs from "pro-corporate centrist" to "left-populist." If you're former Texas congressman Beto O'Rourke —  who falls somewhere in the middle, politically, and somewhere towards the top, looks-wise — you pull a militaristic policy proposal out of your hat that recalls some of the most campy pseudo-fascist sci-fi ever written.

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Here are 5 questions Robert Mueller must answer during his Congressional hearings

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Former special counsel Robert Mueller will be testifying publicly before Congress on July 17th, the chairs of the House Judiciary and House Intelligence committees announced on Tuesday.

The special counsel had fought against testifying but was subpoenaed to compel his attendance.

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 ENOUGH IS ENOUGH 

Trump endorses killing journalists, like Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi. Online ad networks are now targeting sites that cover acts of violence against dissidents, LGBTQ people and people of color.

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