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Alan Dershowitz goes down in flames defending The National Enquirer’s ‘extortion-ish’ threat to Jeff Bezos

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Law professor Alan Dershowitz on Sunday defended The National Enquirer‘s parent company, AMI, and its chairman, David Pecker, against allegations that they attempted to blackmail Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos.

In an interview on ABC’s This Week, Dershowitz claimed that AMI had a First Amendment right to threaten to publish nude photographs of Bezos if he did not drop an investigation into their “catch and kill” business practices.

“The First Amendment needs breathing room,” Dershowitz argued. “This is a fight between two media moguls. There was a negotiation. It was a tough negotiation. I’m certainly not here to defend the journalistic ethics of The National Enquirer, but the First Amendment doesn’t distinguish between The Washington Post, ABC News and The National Enquirer.

“You need to draw a line between what is extortion-ish and what is extortion consistent with the First Amendment,” he added.

Attorney Dan Abrams, however, suggested that Enquirer’s threats amount to “extortion.”

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“There are crimes based on words and that’s what extortion is,” he explained.

“That’s not what I’m talking about,” Dershowitz shot back. “I’m talking about the fact that we’re dealing with media here, and remember too that the alleged extortion occurred in a letter from a lawyer.”

“I have been practicing law for over 50 years and I have never seen an extortion come in the form of a lawyer,” the law professor added. “You don’t get extortion by mail.”

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“Yeah, but the fact that American Media is a media entity does not immunize them from the types of crimes we’re talking about here,” Abrams pointed out.

Watch the video below from ABC.


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Yale psychiatrist: Trump using racism as a coping mechanism as his mental state rapidly deteriorates

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On Wednesday, President Donald Trump continued to attack the young congresswomen of color nicknamed "The Squad," after he was criticized for saying the women should go back to their own countries, even though all four are U.S. citizens. Now, he's doubling down.

On Twitter Wednesday he called the women "left-wing cranks." He added that they were free to leave if they don't like America.

Raw Story spoke with Dr. Bandy X. Lee about the President's racist tirades against Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), Ilhan Omar (D-MN), Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) and Ayanna Pressley (D-ILL).

Lee is a forensic psychiatrist and an expert on violence at Yale School of Medicine. She helped launch a public health approach to global violence prevention as a consultant to the World Health Organization and other United Nations bodies since 2002. She is author of the textbook, “Violence: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Causes, Consequences, and Cures,” president of the World Mental Health Coalition, and editor of the New York Times bestseller, “The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 37 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President.”

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This word is the single biggest tipoff that Trump is lying

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President Donald Trump exhibits a verbal tic that gives away some of his biggest whoppers.

The president tells demonstrable lies on a daily basis, but it's a "flashing red light" that he's lying when he recounts someone calling him "sir," according to CNN fact-checker Daniel Dale.

"Trump has told false 'sir' stories on all manner of subjects: health care, the Middle East, the courts, unions and -- just last week -- both tariffs and social media," Dale wrote. "But no genre of Trump story is more reliably sir-heavy than his collection of suspiciously similar tales about macho men breaking into tears of gratitude in his presence."

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Russia launches criminal case over gay couple’s adoption

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Russia on Wednesday said it had opened an unprecedented criminal case accusing officials of negligence for allowing a gay couple to adopt two children.

The Investigative Committee, which probes serious cases, said that Moscow social workers were suspected of criminal negligence for allowing the two boys to live in the family since 2010.

This is the first such case ever launched, reported Interfax news agency.

"Nothing like this has happened before," said lawyer Maksim Olenichev of Vykhod (Coming Out) support group based in the northwestern city of Saint Petersburg.

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