Quantcast
Connect with us

Trump biographers explain the bizarre reason the president is obsessed with Vietnam

Published

on

President Donald Trump avoided military service in the Vietnam War, but his generation’s signature conflict has long held a prominent place in his psyche.

The president’s biographers say Trump has taken the American retreat from Vietnam as a personal affront that he shares with many of his core voters who feel the U.S. doesn’t win anymore, and are looking for someone else to blame, reported Politico Magazine.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Weakness is Trump’s greatest fear,” said Tony Schwartz, who spent hundreds of hours with Trump while writing “The Art of the Deal.” “(Vietnam is) his worst fear writ large — that the enemy, with far less money and resources, would figure out a way to outwit the Goliath.”

Trump got four education deferments, and then a medical deferment in 1968, that allowed him to avoid serving in Vietnam, although he didn’t protest against the war, either, and over the years he’s repeatedly referred to the conflict in symbolic terms.

“It was the feeling of supremacy that this country had in the 1950s,” Trump told graduating students in a 1988 speech at Lehigh University. “It was a feeling of supremacy. It really was. And I had — I didn’t know it well — I was very young at that point — and I didn’t know the feeling of supremacy. I’ve known that since the Vietnam War.”

Trump often spoke about the Vietnam retreat during campaign rallies before the 2016 election, and the message resonated with many voters, especially those around his age who had lived through that era.

“When I was young and went to school,” Trump said in New Hampshire, “I had always heard we never lost, this country, we never lost a war, you know, World War I, World War II, we just didn’t lose wars. And since then, I mean, when you think of it, you look at Vietnam.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“Prior to Vietnam, we never lost a war, right?” he told a Tennessee rally. “Vietnam was a loss. Nothing else you can call it. And then after that, we now — we don’t even think about winning.”

“Since Vietnam,” he said in Ohio, “we don’t win anymore.”

Trump claims support from Vietnam veterans, even as he derides the military service of the late Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) and Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), who have criticized him.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Like many of that era, he has been fixated on Vietnam ever since,” said Trump biographer Michael D’Antonio. “Those who didn’t serve carry guilt and resentment over the feelings of guilt. Trump isn’t the type to get over anything let alone this issue.”


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

GOP’s Collins demands delay in impeachment hearing after being overwhelmed with Dem’s massive case against Trump

Published

on

Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA) has demanded that Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY) postpone a scheduled House Judiciary Committee hearing slated for Monday after being blindsided by a massive report from the Democrats on the committee making the case for the impeachment of President Donald Trump.

According to Newsmax, Collins -- who has become one of the president's main surrogates opposing ouster of the president -- fired back at the Democrats over their Saturday release of thousands of pages of documents to be considered from the House impeachment investigation.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump revealed his impeachment strategy 21 years ago — when he defended Bill Clinton

Published

on

Digging back into the archives, Politico reveals that President Donald Trump appears to be re-purposing the advice he suggested to Bill Clinton when the embattled Democratic president faced impeachment 21 years ago.

According to the report, Trump made an appearance on NBC's Hardball during the Clinton impeachment saga, where he told host Chris Matthews that Clinton needed to "go after his enemies," which has, to date, been Trump's main response to his own impeachment.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Trump brought along convicted war criminals to secretive Florida fundraiser: report

Published

on

According to a report from the Miami Herald, President Donald Trump was accompanied by two convicted war criminals he recently pardoned when we held a closed-door fundraiser in Florida on Saturday night.

The report states that Trump's appearance at Republican Party of Florida's annual Statesman’s Dinner, where he helped raise $3.5 million for the state party, was held in extreme secrecy with the "1,000 attendees were required to check their cell phones into individual locked cases before they entered the unmarked ballroom."

Continue Reading