Quantcast
Connect with us

‘Trump is sitting in a lawn chair fanning himself’: Watch MSNBC panel trash the president over leaked schedule

Published

on

On Monday, MSNBC’s host Nicolle Wallace compared President Donald Trump to a seven-year-old child after another schedule was leaked showing that the president spent the majority of his day in “unstructured executive time.”

“Donald Trump still managed to spend between three to eight hours a day in unstructured executive time,” she said. “Which we know now involves tweeting away in front of the television.”

“It doesn’t mean you’re working because you’re awake and watching Fox,” Wallace said.

Alexi McCammond, a reporter for Axios then explained that Trump even tweets during the times he is apparently working.

“[I was] tracking the tweets during times he’s supposedly meeting with his chief of staff or during intelligence briefings or policy times because it’s not infrequent,” she said.

ADVERTISEMENT

“He’s retweeting Charlie Kirk while supposedly in a staff meeting, and tweeting about illegal immigration when he’s supposedly meeting with his chief of staff. During lunch, with Mike Pence he is tweeting about fake news. During policy time he is tweeting about other things,” McCammond said.

“If he were seven, it would be called screen time. As a mother of a seven-year-old, screen time is more structured than his executive time. He’s never doing what he says he’s doing,” Wallace said.

Former DNC senior advisor Doug Thornell said that if most Americans had a work ethic like Trump they would be fired.

ADVERTISEMENT

“If most American workers kept a work schedule like this, they would be fired,” he said. “He thinks he has a no-show job where he can just show up and do the bare minimum such as, sit around in a lawn chair and fan himself like a ‘Soprano’ character while everybody else around him is working.”

Watch below via MSNBC:


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected]. Send news tips to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

Trump: Iran claim to break up CIA network ‘totally false’

Published

on

US President Donald Trump on Monday denied Iran's claim that it dismantled a CIA spy ring and arrested 17 suspects with alleged links to the US intelligence agency.

"The report of Iran capturing CIA spies is totally false. Zero truth," Trump tweeted.

"Just more lies and propaganda (like their shot down drone) put out by a Religious Regime that is Badly Failing and has no idea what to do."

"Their Economy is dead, and will get much worse. Iran is a total mess!" Trump added.

Earlier Monday a top Iranian counter-intelligence official told local reporters that the 17 suspects were all Iranians working in "sensitive centers" and the private sector who had acted independently of each other.

Continue Reading

Facebook

Trump’s Commerce Dept plagued by low morale and ‘disarray’ as chief Wilbur Ross falls asleep in meetings: report

Published

on

For months, there has been speculation in Washington, D.C. that Wilbur Ross, secretary of the U.S. Department of Commerce for the Trump Administration, is on his way out. Reports that Ross falls asleep in meetings don’t exactly instill confidence in his leadership. And Politico’s Daniel Lippman, in a troubling report, describes the Commerce Department as being in a state of chaos and disorganization.

Lippman reports that according to his sources, the 81-year-old Ross “spends much of his time at the White House” in order to “retain President Donald Trump’s favor.” And the Commerce Department is suffering, Lippman observes, because of Ross’ “penchant for managing upward at the expense of his staff.”

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

When radioactive wastes aren’t radioactive wastes

Published

on

The U.S. Department of Energy wants to redefine what constitutes high-level radioactive waste, cutting corners on the disposal of some of the most dangerous and long-lasting waste byproduct on earth—reprocessed spent fuel from the nuclear defense program.

The agency announced in October 2018 plans for its reinterpretation of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), as defined in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, with plans to classify waste by its hazard level and not its origin. By using the idea of a reinterpretation of a definition, the DOE may be able to circumvent Congressional oversight. And in its regulatory filing, the DOE, citing the NWPA and Atomic Energy Act of 1954, said it has the authority to “interpret” what materials are classified as high-level waste based on their radiological characteristics. That is not quite true, as Congress specifically defined high-level radioactive waste in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, and any reinterpretation of that definition should trigger a Congressional response.

Continue Reading
 
 
 

Copyright © 2019 Raw Story Media, Inc. PO Box 21050, Washington, D.C. 20009 | Masthead | Privacy Policy | For corrections or concerns, please email [email protected]

Join Me. Try Raw Story Investigates for $1. Invest in Journalism. Escape Ads.
close-image