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Here are the 5 hardest-hitting rebukes in Judge Amy Berman Jackson’s Manafort sentencing

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Judge Amy Berman Jackson issued a scathing takedown of President Donald Trump’s “no collusion mantra” as she sentenced his former campaign chairman Paul Manafort to prison.

Manafort received a surprisingly light four-year sentence last week from Judge T.S. Ellis III on fraud charges, but Jackson imposed an additional 43 months — for a total of 90 months, or seven and a half years.

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Jackson laid into Manafort, who had begged for mercy, saying that he had already learned his lesson, but she pointed out that he had been accused of committing crimes while jailed on previous charges.

“The defendant’s insistence that none of this should be happening to him and that the prosecution is misguided is just one more thing that is inconsistent with the notion of any genuine acceptance of responsibility,” she said. “It would be hard to overstate the number of [Manafort’s] lies and the extent of the fraud.”

The judge blasted Manafort for his greed, saying he’d risked his freedom and reputation for the trappings of wealth.

“Why?” she asked. “Not to support a family but to sustain a lifestyle at the most opulent and extravagant level. More houses than one man can enjoy, more suits than one man can wear.”

Jackson also pointed out that Manafort had shown no remorse for the actions that had landed him in prison.

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“Saying I’m sorry I got caught is not an inspiring plea for leniency,” Jackson said.

Jackson hit Manafort’s attorneys for feeding the president’s narrative, saying that prosecutors had not addressed the issue of collusion in this case, and said that was still under investigation by special counsel Robert Mueller.

“The ‘no collusion’ refrain that runs through the entire defense memorandum is unrelated to matters at hand,” Jackson said. “It’s hard to understand why an attorney would write that … The ‘no collusion’ mantra is simply a non sequitur.”

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The judge then issued what could be taken as a warning to anyone still facing potential charges related to the special counsel probe.

“Court is one of those places where facts still matter,” Jackson said.

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Louisiana Democrat re-elected governor — despite Trump’s rallies for the Republican candidate

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The Associated Press has called the Lousiana's governor's race for incumbent Democrat John Bel Edwards.

Edwards triumphed over Republican businessman Eddie Rispone, who called to concede.

The outcome is another major political loss for President Donald Trump, who had held multiple campaign rallies for Rispone.

During his most recent rally, Trump begged the crowd to give him a "big win" in the election.

Eddie Rispone has conceded the #lagov race to Gov. John Bel Edwards, giving the Democrat four more years in ruby red Louisiana despite Trump’s best efforts to flip the seat. Edwards camp says Rispone called minutes ago to concede. #lagov #lalege

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Press secretary says it is ‘dangerous for the country’ to question whether she is putting out honest info

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Press secretary Stephanie Grisham on Saturday argued it was "dangerous for the country" for anyone to challenge the veracity of her claims.

Grisham made her argument after President Donald Trump went to Walter Reed Hospital for an unannounced doctor's visit, resulting in a great deal of speculation.

Following the visit, Grisham claimed Trump was "healthy" and "without complaints" -- a claim many found unlikely as the president has spent a good deal of time as president airing his many grievances.

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Sondland used WhatsApp to communicate with Ukraine — and won’t turn over the messages: report

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Ambassador Gordon Sondland used WhatsApp to send encrypted messages to a top Ukranian official, The Washington Post reported Saturday.

The communication occurred with Andriy Yermak, a top aide to President Volodymr Zelensky, when Sondland was in Kyiv, the newspaper reported.

"Sondland was also texting back and forth on WhatsApp with Yermak throughout the trip, and had been communicating with other Ukrainian officials over the messaging app in the preceding and subsequent months, according to people familiar with his interactions," The Post reported.

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