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Here’s how House Democrats can expose Trump and his children — even if they’re not willing to impeach

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Trump family (Photo: Lev Radin / Shutterstock)

Impeachment carries potential political peril for House Democrats — but one conservative writer argued they must somehow punish the “despicable behavior” by President Donald Trump that was uncovered by special counsel Robert Mueller.

Norm Ornstein, a contributing editor for National Journal and resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, said full-blown impeachment hearings may prove too risky for Democrats, but he showed in an essay for The Atlantic how they could publicize Mueller’s findings in another way.

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“There is ample evidence of behavior on the part of the president that fits any reasonable definition of high crimes and misdemeanors,” Ornstein wrote, “and most likely there will be a lot more when the Southern District of New York (SDNY) and other jurisdictions of the Justice Department finish their work — at least if (Attorney General William) Barr does not stymie them. The House has a constitutional responsibility to follow up.”

He said a failure to take meaningful action against Trump would no doubt enrage the Democratic base, and he laid out a possible route lawmakers could take that stopped short of impeaching the president.

“What we need is for the Judiciary, Intelligence, and Homeland Security Committees to conduct a series of deep dives into the areas of communication and coordination between Trump and his campaign with Russians and their surrogates, such as WikiLeaks,” Ornstein wrote, “the multiple categories and areas of obstruction of justice that Robert Mueller outlined; the threats to our intelligence operations and our justice system from Trump and his operatives; and the moves by Russia to interfere in and influence our elections used by Trump and unchecked by Republicans.”

Other committees should be prepared to do the same thing as new information about possible Russian money laundering emerges from the SDNY investigation and probes by New York’s attorney general.

Ornstein urged Democrats to coordinate the hearings so they don’t overwhelm the public with evidence, and he suggested that each committee use an experienced lawyer, such as former U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara, to lead the hearings.

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He also proposed doing away with five-minute rounds of questioning, which disrupts hearing continuity, and give the counsel an hour to ask questions of witnesses, or perhaps give a small group of committee members 15 to 30 minutes to ask questions on a given topic.

“This system might cause hard feelings among members who will not get their five minutes in the sun — and would reduce the public role for chairs — but it is better suited to accomplish the larger goal,” Ornstein wrote. “And that larger goal is to build a compelling record, through vivid testimony, of what Trump and his people, including his children, did and did not do, said and did not say truthfully, that is the core of Mueller’s report.”


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Moon may be richer in water than thought — and it could help propel humans farther from earth

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There may be far more water on the Moon than previously thought, according to two studies published Monday raising the tantalising prospect that astronauts on future space missions could find refreshment -- and maybe even fuel -- on the lunar surface.

The Moon was believed to be bone dry until around a decade ago when a series of findings suggested that our nearest celestial neighbour has traces of water trapped in the surface.

Two new studies published in Nature Astronomy on Monday suggest there could be much more water than previously thought, including ice stored in permanently shadowed "cold traps" at lunar polar regions.

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Asymptomatic coronaagvirus sufferers lose antibodies sooner: study

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Asymptomatic coronavirus sufferers appear to lose detectable antibodies sooner than people who have exhibited Covid-19 symptoms, according to one of the biggest studies of its kind in Britain published on Tuesday.

The findings by Imperial College London and market research firm Ipsos Mori also suggest the loss of antibodies was slower in 18–24 year-olds compared to those aged 75 and over.

Overall, samples from hundreds of thousands of people across England between mid-June and late September showed the prevalence of virus antibodies fell by more than a quarter.

The research, commissioned by the British government and published Tuesday by Imperial, indicates people's immune response to Covid-19 reduces over time following infection.

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2020 Election

Early voting to be hit by heavy rain and flooding as Hurricane Zeta barrels towards the Gulf Coast

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Hurricane Zeta is expected to make landfall near Louisiana's border with Mississippi on Wednesday evening as campaigns work to get supporters to the polls and convince any undecided voters to back their candidate.

"Hurricane conditions and life-threatening storm surge are possible along portions of the northern Gulf Coast on Wednesday, and Storm Surge and Hurricane Watches are in effect," the National Hurricane Center warned.

"Between Tuesday night and Thursday, heavy rainfall is expected from portions of the central Gulf Coast into the southern Appalachians and Mid-Atlantic states near and in advance of Zeta. This rainfall will lead to flash, urban, small stream, and minor river flooding," the center explained.

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