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Ben Carson fires back at Rep. Katie Porter — and insists she’s the one who is confused about REOs

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Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson on Wednesday offered to educate Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA) about real estate owned property (REO), a term he appeared to be unfamiliar with during a Tuesday hearing.

During a House Financial Services Committee, Carson confused REOs with Oreo cookies as he was questioned by Porter about foreclosures.

“It was, first of all, it was 3 1/2 hours of testimony. So you can see that some of the networks are only interested those kinds of sound bites that they can use to ridicule,” Carson told Stuart Varney of the Fox Business Network.

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“You know the fact of the matter is, I was having difficulty hearing her. And, of course, I’m very familiar with foreclosed properties. And with REOs. I have read extensively about them. Knew about them, even as a teenager. There was a lot of blighted areas in Detroit where I grew up.”

“But what is interesting, you know, that we, when a family gets into a problem with their mortgage and it is backed by our agency we go through a lot of procedures with the banks to make sure that they don’t get foreclosed upon. In a few cases where they do, obviously, we’re able to sell those properties very quickly. And the, REO portfolio, just over the last 10 years, has dramatically decreased by tenfold,” Carson added.

“You know, 65,000 down to 6500. So I suspect when Katie Porter was an expert in this area things were very different. That is why I invited her to speak with our staff that deals with these so they can bring her up to date. Maybe she would then be able to understand what is going on,” he concluded.

Porter said Wednesday that Carson’s responses at the hearing indicated he wasn’t prepared for his job.

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“My questions were serious — they weren’t designed to be funny,” Porter said. “He’s clearly done absolutely nothing to even learn about this problem, much less address it.”


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2020 Election

Virginia was the bellwether of 2017’s big blue wave — but could it happen again?

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In November 2017, powered by a surge of grassroots activism one year after Donald Trump’s election, Democrats wiped out a Republican supermajority in the Virginia House of Delegates, and came within one disputed ballot and a random drawing of sharing power in a 50-50 chamber — an early harbinger of the 2018 blue wave. Now they’re back to finish the job, aiming to recapture control of both legislative chambers for the first time in 26 years and set the tone for the 2020 election.

Swing Left, a key player in flipping the House of Representatives last year, has targeted 15 races in the House of Delegates and five in the State Senate. Their main focus is people power, but they’ve also raised more than $550,000 in grassroots donations as of Sept. 11. Just two seats are needed to flip each chamber, and a court-ordered redistricting has made flipping the House much more doable.

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‘Did Obama know?’ Rudy Giuliani flings wild new accusations against Biden in overnight tweet rant

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President Donald Trump's personal attorney Rudy Giuliani hurled accusations of Ukraine corruption at Joe Biden and his son in a series of middle-of-the-night tweets.

The president admitted Sunday to speaking to Ukraine's president about an investigation of Hunter Biden's business dealings with a natural gas company in the country, after a series of reports revealed his efforts to pressure that government to come up with dirt on the former vice president.

Early Monday morning, Giuliani accused Kiev of laundering $3 million to Hunter Biden and suggested the Obama administration was aware but did nothing, although the former New York City mayor offered no supporting evidence of those allegations.

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Chronically underpaid EMTs are being assaulted at record rates

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If Upton Sinclair were to write the modern equivalent to “The Jungle,” he might make the setting the metaphorical meat grinder of today’s emergency medical services industry.

Across the nation, emergency medical service professionals, the front-line workforce upon which so much of a patient outcome rests, are grossly underpaid for brutal work schedules that put them at risk of both serious physical injury and burnout.

The cherry on the top of this abuse sundae is that they are 14 times more likely to be violently assaulted on the job than a firefighter.

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