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Kentucky farmers are afraid to criticize Trump because they fear Republican retaliation: Retired farmer

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In media outlets, there has been much discussion of the effects that President Donald Trump’s tariffs are having on farmers in the United States. But retired Kentucky farmer Jim Pat Wilson, in an op-ed for Kentucky’s Courier Journal, asserts that there is one group of people in the U.S. who are often afraid to speak out against Trump’s trade policies: farmers.

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Since his retirement from farming, Wilson has been growing hay for horse owners and leasing land to beef producers — and he stresses that many farmers fear retaliation from the Republican Party if they criticize Trump’s trade policies.

“Caught in the Republican Party’s political crosshairs,” Wilson writes, “farmers are stuck in an environment that has cultivated fear for anyone who dares to speak against the mighty GOP…. I have a lot less to lose than some of my farming friends, and I want to speak up for those who fear they will be retaliated against.”

Farmers, Wilson explains “don’t want handouts, they want solutions.” Trump’s policies, he stresses, are bad for farmers — and the “$16 billion bailout” for farmers that Trump has promised “comes from the chaos of his own making.”

“Just like Mexico isn’t paying for a wall,” Wilson warns, “China won’t pay for Trump’s tariffs. The funds will ultimately come from the taxpayers because it is federal money that is used for the bailouts. Adding insult to injury, the Republican 2020 budget calls for a 15% funding drop for the Department of Agriculture.”

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The Trump Administration, Wilson explains, “has made it impossible for farmers to criticize without retaliation from Republican landowners.”

Wilson concludes his op-ed by emphasizing that farmers who are afraid to criticize Trump’s policies publicly can speak out in the voting booth.

“Republicans have divided neighbors, and our farmers who dare to go against the grain are siloed for speaking up,” Wilson writes. “That’s why so many remain silent. Come Election Day, I hope our farmers find the confines of the ballot box a place for their own retaliation.”

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Parents furious after Melania Trump invites UN students to Stock Exchange visit

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Parents at a United Nations school are objecting to their children being invited to the New York Stock Exchange with Melania Trump.

The White House invited 10 students to attend the daily bell ringing with the first lady, but some parents at the United Nations International School are furious their children might be used as political props, reported the New York Daily News.

“I am profoundly disappointed by the decision to accept this invitation,” said one UN worker and parent in a letter sent to a UN undersecretary-general.

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‘Early Bordello’: Internet slams Melania Trump’s redecoration of White House rooms

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In 2015, Rep. Aaron Schock (R-Ill) was forced to resign following revelations that he'd misused campaign and public funds. The inquiry into his spending was triggered by the lush ornateness of his office decor. While most of his colleagues worked out of plain, professional offices, Schock's working space was reminiscent of Downtown Abbey.

Writing in the Journal Star, columnist Phil Luciano observed that First Lady Melania Trump's redecoration of several White House rooms seems to borrow heavily from Schock's style.

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‘The ground is shifting’: Longtime GOP aide sounds the alarm that Trump is putting Arizona in play

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Chuck Coughlin, who once served as a top aide to two different Republican governors in Arizona, is warning that President Donald Trump is putting his state in play for the 2020 presidential election.

In an interview with Politico, Coughlin said his party has expressed real anxiety about the state turning blue next year.

"Republicans are very concerned,” he said. "The ground is shifting."

At the moment, just 45 percent of Arizona voters have a favorable view of Trump, while 53 percent have an unfavorable view. Additionally, the victory of Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) in last year's midterm elections showed that Democrats can be competitive in statewide races in a place that became famous for electing iconic conservative senators such as John McCain and Barry Goldwater.

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