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McConnell is working to keep Trumpism alive — no matter what voters say in 2020

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Fearful of losing the Oval Office and knowing the highly-charged 2020 election will kick into high gear in January of 2020, political insiders claim that Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) is trampling all the rules of the Senate to get as many of Donald Trump’s court nominees approved as quickly as he can.

According to a report in Politico, Trump plans to use packing the courts with rightwing judges as a campaign boast to rally his base – and McConnell is doing all he can to make Trump’s wishes come true.

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“Trump’s team believes that stacking the judicial system with conservative judges galvanizes the base, demonstrates his ability to follow through on a 2016 campaign promise and will help win over crucial 2020 states like Colorado, Florida and North Carolina,” the report states, before adding, ” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has done everything he can to help quicken the pace, changing procedural rules to limit debate time and lower the voting threshold Supreme Court justices must clear to get approved.”

According to Daniel Goldberg, legal director at the Alliance for Justice, “I am not sure how they can speed it up anymore. Mitch McConnell has already eroded almost every rule and norm to expedite Trump’s far-right judges with as little transparency and vetting as possible.”

The report notes that conservative activists who are helping shepherd like-minded jurists through the approval process have an underlying strategy to pack the benches with younger judges who can hand down rulings for generations.

Additionally, they are tackling the lower courts due to a logjam at the Supreme Court.

“Given how few cases the Supreme Court takes, the appeals court are making a ton of important decisions in which they are the last word,” explained Rorie Solberg, a professor of political science at Oregon State University.

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Politico notes that the Senate will have confirmed 15 judges in the past six weeks due to McConnell’s maneuvering.

“Obviously that’s going to be one of the most lasting legacies of the Trump administration and the next 25 to 30 years,” boasted Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX), a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee. “I think it’ll remain a priority especially when our Democratic colleagues don’t seem too interested in legislating, particularly in the House.”

You can read more here.

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WATCH: Protesters celebrate as Chase Bank was set ablaze during Portland protests

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Trump alerts ‘active-duty U.S. military police’ for possible deployment to Minnesota: report

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President Donald Trump's administration is contemplating using active-duty U.S. troops in an attempt to quell the protests in Minneapolis, the Associated Press reported early Saturday morning.

As unrest spread across dozens of American cities on Friday, the Pentagon took the rare step of ordering the Army to put several active-duty U.S. military police units on the ready to deploy to Minneapolis, where the police killing of George Floyd sparked the widespread protests," the AP reported.

"Soldiers from Fort Bragg in North Carolina and Fort Drum in New York have been ordered to be ready to deploy within four hours if called, according to three people with direct knowledge of the orders. Soldiers in Fort Carson, in Colorado, and Fort Riley in Kansas have been told to be ready within 24 hours. The people did not want their names used because they were not authorized to discuss the preparations," the AP explained.

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John Roberts joins liberals as Supreme Court rejects challenge to Newsom’s COVID-19 limits on California church attendance

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In a 5-4 ruling, the Supreme Court on Friday rejected an emergency appeal from the South Bay United Pentecostal Church in Chula Vista, California. The San Diego area church tried to challenge the state's limits on attendance at worship services:

The church argued that limits on how many people can attend their services violate constitutional guarantees of religious freedom and had been seeking an order in time for services on Sunday. The church said it has crowds of 200 to 300 people for its services.

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