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Trump government in chaotic mess because of administration’s revolving door vacancies

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The federal government is dealing with “unprecedented” vacancies in the Trump administration, and many jobs still have no nominees.

The top jobs at the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives remain unfilled, and there are no nominees for 132 positions and 138 nominees are awaiting Senate confirmation, reported NBC News.

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“What we have seen is unprecedented, with consistent vacancies across the government,” said Max Stier, head of the nonprofit Partnership for Public Service, which tracks presidential appointments.

Constant turnover opens up many jobs, and the slow nomination pace keeps them open.

“There’s still an element of musical chairs — filling one job and creating a vacancy somewhere else,” Steir said. “(That causes) cascading effects. Somebody leaves, others follow. You’re creating disruptions throughout the whole organization.”

Trump’s nominees are averaging a record show 105 days between nomination and confirmation, which is 12 days longer than Barack Obama’s nominees and more than double the time for George W. Bush’s.

President Donald Trump has finally put forward a nominee for secretary of defense by tapping acting secretary Patrick Shanahan five months after James Mattis departed the administration, and he has put forward nominations in the past two weeks to head Immigration and Customs Enforcement and the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

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But the administration still has vacancies in 277 top positions out of just over 700 appointments that require Senate confirmation.


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Buffalo has a long history of protecting cops from criminal charges: report

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On Saturday, The Daily Beast documented the recent history of use of force in the Buffalo Police Department, which is reeling from controversy as two officers face assault charges for shoving a 75-year-old protester to the ground.

"As shocking as this all may be to outsiders, the shoving of demonstrator Martin Gugino and the defiant response of officers to an effort to discipline two of their own is indicative of the state of police affairs in Buffalo," wrote Jim Heaney. "Has been for a long time, not that you have to go back too far to find other episodes of brutality that have been captured on video."

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Internet disgusted after Buffalo first responders cheer cops charged with assaulting 75-year-old protester

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Commenters on Twitter expressed both contempt and disgust for Buffalo firefighters and police officers who turned out in front of Buffalo City Court to support two suspended police officers with applause and cheering.

Moments after officers Aaron Torglaski and Robert McCabe were charged with second-degree assault and then released without having to post bail, they were greeted as heroes outside the courthouse.

After a video was posted showing the celebration, commenters on Twitter vented at cops and firefighters for defending the two officers who assaulted the 75-year-old man who had to be rushed to a hospital after they shoved him to the ground where he sustained a head injury.

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Donald Trump’s lurch toward fascism is backfiring spectacularly

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Welcome to another edition of What Fresh Hell?, Raw Story’s roundup of news items that might have become controversies under another regime, but got buried – or were at least under-appreciated – due to the daily firehose of political pratfalls, unhinged tweet storms and other sundry embarrassments coming out of the current White House.

During the 2016 campaign, as Donald Trump railed against "Mexican rapists" and other "criminal aliens," pollsters found that the share of Americans who said that immigrants worked hard and made a positive contribution to our society increased significantly, and noticed a similar decline in the share who said they take citizens' jobs and burden our social safety net. After Trump was elected and began pursuing his Muslim ban, the share of respondents who held a positive view of Islam also increased pretty dramatically. I'm not aware of any polling of the general public about transgender troops serving in the military before Trump decided to discharge them, but Gallup found that 71 percent of respondents opposed his position after he did.

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