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Trump’s perceived wealth is as psychologically important to him as ‘the size and performance of his hands’: Nicolle Wallace

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MSNBC anchor Nicolle Wallace offered a fascinating psychological analysis of President Donald Trump during an appearance on MSNBC’s new “Saturday Night Politics” show with Donny Deutsch.

“Day in and day out we’re following Mueller, we’re following Russia,” the host noted. “I think the real dirty gem in there is the Russian money that’s going to come out, because the big question is other than Deutsche Bank where is he getting his money from? That’s when it becomes black and white.”

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Wallace, who was a top Republican communications strategist prior to her career in broadcast journalism, offered viewers a warning before she offered her theory.

“This might be a little genderish and if it makes you squirm I’m sorry, Donald Trump is obsessed with the size of his — hands,” she said.

“Turns out if one thing’s fake — and just girl in the bar — if your hair is fake and the hand size is something that gets under your skin and your wealth turns out to be fake,” she explained.

“You are taking up residence inside Donald Trump’s head in a way that could be devastating in a way that has nothing to do with whether you gave to charity or where the money came from,” she suggested.

“Donald Trump’s wealth is a primal as the time and energy he spends on his hairdo, defending the size and performance of his hands as he did in that debate in the primaries with Marco Rubio,” she continued.

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“This stuff is ridiculous and uncomfortable, but it matters to him,” Wallace added. “And if I’m a Democratic strategist I want to understand what matters to him.”

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Tennessee Republican says he hasn’t ‘really studied’ whether the Civil War was about slavery

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On Thursday, The Tennessean's Natalie Allison reported that Tennessee state Rep. Mike Sparks, who makes a habit of complaining that "young people" and "journalists" don't bother to study history, could not answer a basic question about what the Civil War was fought over.

"Was the Civil War about slavery?" asked a reporter.

"I haven't really studied it," said Sparks.

"You said you know history!" said another reporter.

"I just think we need to all study history," said Sparks, still not answering the question. "There's different contexts."

This comes during a debate over whether to remove a bust of Confederate general and suspected Klan leader Nathan Bedford Forrest. Another lawmaker, state Sen. Joey Hensley, defended Forrest, arguing that "3,000 Blacks attended his funeral" — a common but unproven claim of Confederate sympathizers.

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Law professor schools Trump’s legal team on why their Supreme Court arguments failed

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Fordham Law Professor Jed Sugerman noted on Twitter, that Thursday's Supreme Court ruling should be a "teachable moment" for the lawyers at the Mazars firm, which fought the disclosure of President Donald Trump's financial information.

During the oral arguments with the High Court about the New York case, Trump attorney Jay Sekulow argued that as president Trump was above the law.

"In both cases, petitioners contended that the subpoenas lacked a legitimate legislative purpose and violated the separation of powers," the Supreme Court said in the decision. "The President did not, however, argue that any of the requested records were protected by executive privilege."

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Holding US government to its treaty promises ‘for once,’ Supreme Court rules nearly half of Oklahoma still Native American territory

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"The big news at the Supreme Court today will be Trump's taxes," said Cherokee writer Rebecca Nagle. "But for Indians in Oklahoma, we'll be talking about today for decades."

Indigenous leaders on Thursday hailed the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in McGirt vs. Oklahoma as a victory for tribal sovereignty for affirming that the U.S. government's treaty with the Muscogee (Creek) Nation must still be recognized by Congress and that nearly half of what is known as the U.S. state of Oklahoma is actually Native American land.

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