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‘You don’t get to do that!’ Rep. Ayanna Pressley shuts down Ben Carson for evading her questions

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Rep. Ayanna Pressley (D-MA) on Tuesday got into a contentious exchange with Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson over his department’s budget cuts that she says are harming safety in public housing.

During a hearing held by House Financial Services Committee, Pressley aggressively questioned Carson about the importance of living in safe housing for young children.

“Given your medical background, perhaps you could weigh in on the health consequences of failing to invest in safe housing,” she said. “Yes or no: Is stable and safe housing a social determinant of health?”

“It sounds like you have not been here and heard most of the testimony,” Carson replied.

“Please just answer the question,” she said. “Is stable and safe housing a social determinant of health?”

“There is no question that it is important…” Carson began.

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“Yes or no?” Pressley insisted.

“No question that it’s important,” Carson replied.

“It is well documented that health problems such as lead poisoning, asthma, and injuries from trips and falls — especially among our senior population — can be linked to substandard housing conditions,” she continued. “Yes or no: If left unaddressed, do you believe the substandard public housing conditions pose a risk to tenants’ physical, mental and emotional health?”

“Yes or no, can you answer me some questions yourself?” Carson replied.

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“You don’t get to dictate what my line of questioning is!” Pressley shot back. “You’re a very smart man, you understand the question, please answer it.”

“You already know the answer,” Carson replied. “Reclaiming my time.”

“You don’t get to do that!” Pressley replied.

“Oh,” said Carson.

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2020 Election

Here are 5 reasons why 2020’s down-ballot races could reshape America’s future

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The political press always tends to focus mostly on the marquee race for the White House but that's especially true this cycle, as Donald Trump runs for a second term. He demands attention and his antics enrage his opponents and delight his supporters in equal measure.

But national reporters risk missing the big picture by centering so much of their reporting at the top when many of the most important political battles in 2020 will take place further down the ballot.

Trump is catnip for reporters and their editors, but the dearth of coverage of downballot races didn't begin with his election. As the news media in general faces structural changes—with print circulation declining and much of their work moving into digital spaces that are more difficult to monetize--publishers have cut back on reporters assigned to the state and local government beat. Nevertheless, Trump has arguably worsened the trend by getting so much airtime— one estimate suggested that over the past four years, Trump has taken up, on average, 15 percent of the entire daily news cycle on the three leading cable networks, nearly three times what Obama did.

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2020 Election

WATCH: Katie Porter explains to constituents why her conscience demands support for Trump impeachment inquiry

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Congresswoman Katie Porter, in a video posted on social media Monday night, shared with residents of her purple California district why she is joining dozens of other Democrats who support launching an impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump.

"I didn't come to Congress to impeach the president," said the first-term representative. "But when faced with a crisis of this magnitude, I cannot with a clean conscience ignore my duty to defend the Constitution. I can't claim to be committed to rooting out corruption and putting people over politics and then not apply those same principles and standards in all of the work I do."

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2020 Election

Bernie Sanders calls fact that minimum wage worker cannot afford 2-bedroom apartment in any US state ‘a national disgrace’

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For a decade, U.S. lawmakers have kept the federal minimum wage at a level which increasingly leaves workers unable to afford housing.

That's according to a report from the National Low Income Housing Coalition (NLIHC). The group's 30th annual study of housing affordability found that a worker earning the federal minimum wage of $7.25—which is unchanged since 2009—cannot afford to rent a modest two-bedroom apartment in any state, metropolitan area, or county in the United States.

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