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The View erupts when Meghan McCain complains her dad suffered worse than migrant kids while held as war prisoner

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Meghan McCain tempered her outrage over the Trump administration’s detention of children because she feels her father endured worse treatment as a captured Navy airman during the Vietnam War.

“The View” co-host agreed migrant children were being held in inhumane conditions along the southern border, but she found it hard to summon moral outrage.

“I just want to say one quick thing,” she said. “Apparently, by the way, me saying, ‘Can I say one quick thing,’ is now becoming a parody — it’s just how I talk, it’s one of my tics, I’m sorry.

“Calling these places torture facilities — I understand it’s a humanitarian crisis,” McCain continued. “It’s horrific to detain — like you said, people in jail get soap and people in jail get toothpaste — but I know what a torture facility looks like. I’ve been to one.”

Co-host Joy Behar tried to push back, but McCain brushed her off.

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“Listen to me, excuse me,” McCain said. “When you have a facility whose specific purpose is to torture people, that is not what’s going on. Yes, it’s inhumane, but there’s a big difference between the Hanoi Hilton and what’s happening at the border right now.”

Co-host Sunny Hostin argued that she was changing the subject by splitting rhetorical hairs.

“We should be less concerned about what we’re calling them and what goes on inside of them,” Hostin said, as McCain sputtered about hyperbolic language. “I don’t think it matters what we’re calling them — kids are dying inside of them. We should care about the dead kids that have come out of them.”

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McCain insisted her father’s injuries were arguably worse after he was freed from the North Vietnamese prison.

“Well, my father couldn’t lift me above his head as a child because of his torture wounds, so I do think that hyperbole is important,” McCain said.

Behar drew an important distinction her co-host seemed to be missing.

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“That was a war, and they were grownups,” Behar said.


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Former Fox & Friends co-host Clayton Morris flees the US as he faces two dozen lawsuits

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Facing more than two-dozen lawsuits alleging he committed real estate fraud, former "Fox & Friends Weekend" co-host Clayton Morris has reportedly fled the United States, according to the Indianapolis Star.

Morris, who previously resided in a $1.4 million home in New Jersey, moved his family to a coastal resort town in Portugal, the newspaper reported, citing a Facebook post from his wife.

Morris's wife and business partner, former MSNBC anchor Natali Morris, told the IndyStar that she and her husband plan to continue fighting the lawsuits from abroad.

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Trump defenders argued his latest tweets weren’t really racist — but he just completely undercut their arguments

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If you try to defend President Donald Trump, you will always end up having the rug pulled out from underneath you. It's a law of nature.

And yet, so many of the president's allies have failed to learn this simple lesson. So when Trump launched a new attack at progressive Democratic lawmakers that was one of his most obviously racist smears, inevitably, some of his defenders tried to deny the obvious truth.

His screed attacked a group of women who have come to define the left wing of the Democratic caucus, which includes Reps. Ilhan Omar (MN), Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (NY), Rashida Talib (MI), and Ayanna Pressley (MA). Though only Omar is an immigrant (she was a refugee from Somalia as a child), Trump seemed to assume all four women of color weren't born in the United States, and most egregiously, he suggested they should "go back" to other countries:

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UK prime minister hopefuls slam Trump tweets — but refuse to call them racist

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The two candidates vying to become Britain's next prime minister both condemned on Monday US President Donald Trump's xenophobic tweets about progressive Democrat congresswomen as "totally offensive" and "totally unacceptable".

But front-runner Boris Johnson and Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt refused to call the tweets racist when pressed to do so during their last debate before next week's announcement of who will succeed Prime Minister Theresa May.

May's spokesman had earlier said that the outgoing leader's view was that Trump's comments were "completely unacceptable".

On Monday Trump doubled down on a series of his tweets from the day before urging the four congresswomen of colour to "go back" to the countries they came from.

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