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Trump and the GOP stand for ‘blaming others if you’re not happy where you are’: Democratic congressman

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Unapologetic about his racist attacks on four Democratic congresswomen of color, President Donald Trump stood smugly by at his Wednesday rally in Greenville, South Carolina as his supporters attacked Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) with chants of “Send her back! Send her back!”

In conversation with CNN’s Chris Cuomo, Rep. Cedric Richmond (D-LA) denounced it as just standard operating procedure for this president and the party that elected him.

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“I want to talk health care, but … [Trump] ain’t going to campaign on health care,” said Cuomo. “He’s going to campaign that there’s something wrong with the way you look and people like you are a little bit of a danger. And we’re a little bit better off when you guys stay where you were before you were here. That’s his campaign. He is confident. How do you counter?”

“Chris, I think there’s a book called Stranger in Their Own Land, which adequately portrays what Trump does,” said Richmond, who co-chairs Vice President Joe Biden’s 2020 campaign. “And that is he will convince people to vote against their own self-interest by convincing them the reason why they don’t like their status in life is that minorities are skipping the line to take benefits that they should have, and that government is picking winners and losers and the government are picking black people and brown people and women over them simply because of their minority status.”

“And I think you have to call them on it,” added Richmond. “We can’t sit here and pretend that people don’t fall for it. I see people in Louisiana, I see people in Mississippi, Georgia vote against their self-interest all the time, because of their emotions and the fact that the Republican leadership has chosen to campaign by division and blaming others if you’re not happy where you are.”

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Legal analyst rips senators for ‘getting the vapers’ and using Schiff ‘being mean’ as an excuse to vote against witnesses

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Senators are already trying to come up with an excuse not to support calling witnesses for the impeachment trial and CNN legal analyst Jeff Toobin thinks they found it.

According to CNN's Manu Raju, Sens. Susan Collins (R-ME), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), John Barrasso (R-WY), Tom Cotton (R-AR) and Jim Risch (R-ID) freaked out about a CBS News report cited by Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) that a Trump confidant said if the Republicans vote against Trump their "head will be in a pike."

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CNN

Susan Collins denies CBS report that a Trump friend threatened Republicans’ heads ‘will be on a pike’

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CBS News reported this week that a friend of the president's threatened U.S. senators if they were thinking of voting in support of witnesses.

“Vote against the president and your head will be on a pike," the Trump confidant said.

https://twitter.com/CBSEveningNews/status/1220491412854185984

According to Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME), however, it was a lie and no one ever said it.

CNN's Manu Raju revealed after the Senate adjourned that Collins audibly disputed Schiff's quote of the story during the trial.

"She shook her head and said, 'No they didn't. No, that's not true,'" Raju reported.

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Here’s why Trump and McConnell can’t hold up impeachment witnesses during the Senate trial: Ex-special counsel

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) has been threatening senators that if they voted for witnesses to appear and be questioned, then it would turn the impeachment into an overwhelmingly long and drawn-out process. It's an argument that President Donald Trump's legal team has also argued. The problem is that it is legally incorrect, according to a former special counsel to the Defense Department.

In a panel discussion with CNN, Ryan Goodman said that there's no legal basis for this claim.

"In fact, the Senate can decide the matter and it wouldn't be litigated," Goodman explained. "If the Senate decided to issue the subpoenas and the Chief Justice, in fact, sent those subpoenas, it would be the final word. There's a Supreme Court case about this, Nixon v. United States, Judge Nixon, which said the Senate sets the rules and the courts review it. So, it's not like it will be litigated in a way. They are the final word."

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