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Trump’s making a bet that his racist attacks will boost his support with white women

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President Donald Trump is losing support among white, working-class women — but he’s making a gamble that his racist attacks on Democratic congresswomen will win them back.

Polling throughout Trump’s presidency has shown that women voters are more concerned over his offensive rhetoric than men, and recent surveys show he’s not getting much credit from voters who say they’re satisfied with the economy, reported The Atlantic.

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That might be why he’s stoking racist division.

“To offset that unusual defection among the economically content,” wrote the magazine’s senior editor Ronald Brownstein, “Trump must maximize his margins — and turnout — among the groups that have been most receptive to his exclusionary racist and cultural messages: older, non-urban, evangelical-Christian, and non-college-educated white voters.”

Democratic pollster Stanley Greenberg said that working-class white men are a lost cause for Democrats next year, but women in that same demographic believe Trump has failed to deliver for them — particularly on health care.

But polling does show that non-college-educated white women are almost as hostile as their male counterparts to liberal policies — single-payer health care, health coverage for undocumented migrants and decriminalizing unauthorized border crossings — promoted by Democratic presidential candidates.

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Although their hostility isn’t quite as intense as it is for men, they generally agree on the same broad themes, Brownstein wrote.

“A majority (of white, working-class voters) agree on several ideas: that the growing number of immigrants threatens traditional American values, that the U.S. way of life must be protected against foreign influence, and that white people face as much discrimination as black people,” Brownstein wrote. “All of those attitudes correlate with support for Trump.”

Trump’s attacks on first-year lawmakers such as Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-CA) and Ilhan Omar (D-MN) can be seen as an attempt to intensify those hostilities in hopes of motivating white, working-class women to show up at the polls for him in 2020.

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“Trump is in something of a political box with working-class white women,” Brownstein wrote. “He can activate their cultural and racial anxieties with more attacks of the kind he’s directed against the so-called squad of liberal Democratic congresswomen. But in the process, he’s likely to also intensify their concerns about his divisiveness and perceived ‘bullying.'”

Trump, however, seems to be gambling that those women won’t care.


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2020 Election

Trump’s 2020 campaign distances itself from absurdly violent pro-Trump video

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A brutal video clip depicting Donald Trump shooting and stabbing media characters and political opponents was shown at a conference for his supporters, the New York Times reported Sunday.

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2020 Election

Furious ex-White House official rains hell on Trump video of church slaughter: ’Mass shootings are not jokes!’

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2020 Election

Voters often parrot the party line, even when polls suggest otherwise

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As the 2020 election approaches, voters will see a variety of polls. Many of them will be misleading.

Over time, political science has learned which types of questions are informative and which are not, based on models of public opinion. But many of the questions that polling organizations ask simply do not inform the public.

I am a political scientist who studies polarization and the gaps between the public and their representatives on political matters.

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