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Firearm violence expert says the ‘good guy with a gun’ myth is a ‘collective adolescent fantasy’

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Speaking with PBS Newshour this week, firearm safety expert Dr. Garen Wintemute of UC Davis Medical Center offered a firm rebuttal to the claim — often repeated by defenders of gun ownership — that the only thing that can stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun.

Host Judy Woodruff asked about some of the proposals being floated to respond to the recent mass shootings in Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas. One proposal often favored by conservatives is the expansion of “concealed carry” laws that would let people permitted to arms themselves in public with a hidden gun to use their state-issued licenses across state lines.

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But this idea doesn’t make much sense, according to Wintemute.

“Both Texas and Ohio, where we have had mass shootings just in the past few days, are places with concealed carry, at least one with open carry, where it’s hard for me to imagine that among the people wisely running away from that shooting scene were a substantial number of people who were themselves armed,” he said. “We have this collective adolescent fantasy, if I may, that an armed civilian is going to step up and prevent these events. The data show that that almost never happens.”

Expansion of concealed carry standards across state lines also might be “counterproductive,” he said, because it would force states that set high standards for issuing licenses to essentially lower their standard to for people coming from elsewhere.

The claim that having more people walking around with concealed weapons is also belied by the broader evidence. Data has consistently shown that, the more guns a place has, the more homicides are likely to occur. And a recent study found that right-to-carry handgun laws actually lead to a significant increase in violent crime.

This accords with common sense. For every rare case in which a person with a concealed gun actually stops a potential mass shooter, how many more cases will there be where a misunderstanding leads to violence? Or a firearm is accidentally discharged? Or a gun is stolen? The more guns around, the more common these inevitabilities become. The fewer guns we have, the fewer people will die because of them.

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‘Not supposed to be that way!’ Bitter Trump whines about Senate possibly letting John Bolton testify

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President Donald Trump on Monday whined about the Senate potentially letting former national security adviser John Bolton testify during his impeachment trial.

"They didn’t want John Bolton and others in the House," the president wrote on Twitter. "They were in too much of a rush. Now they want them all in the Senate. Not supposed to be that way!"

In reality, the House impeachment investigators tried to get Bolton to testify during their inquiry, but he refused to appear unless he got legal clearance to do so. However, Bolton has now offered to testify before the Senate even though he did not comply with House requests to do the same.

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Ex-GOP impeachment manager ripped to shreds on CNN for ‘upside down’ defense of Trump’s conduct

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On CNN Monday, two veterans of the impeachment proceedings against President Bill Clinton clashed over whether President Donald Trump was guilty of impeachable offenses.

"My view is that the phrase that the president's lawyers included in their six-page answer over the weekend is absolutely ironclad, perfectly correct," said Bob Barr, a former House impeachment manager against Clinton. "The language in the Constitution says very clearly that the only basis on which a president can be impeached and removed from office is treason, bribery or other high crimes and misdemeanors. You have to have a crime. And no matter how much rhetoric you put around that to try and get around it, that is a fact, a legal fact, you have to have a crime."

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Donald Trump and Ben Carson are destroying one of MLK’s most enduring legacies

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President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Fair Housing Act just days after the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King -- and President Donald Trump's Housing secretary wants to undo that legacy.

The 1968 law hasn't been able to undo the harm from government-sanctioned housing segregation, which still feeds today's wealth and racial inequality, but the Department of Housing and Urban Development wants to remove a protection for black owners who pay unfairly high property taxes, reported the New York Times.

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