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GOP senators terrified Trump will crash the economy — and doom their careers

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On Thursday, Politico reported that GOP senators are increasingly nervous that President Donald Trump’s policies will cause an economic downturn — and hurt their own political prospects.

Of particular concern to Republicans is the trade war, which has cost the economy billions of dollars and has no clear objective or exit strategy.

“There’s no question that trade uncertainty is contributing to the slowdown,” Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA) told Politico. “We’re in a very good place. The danger is: Where are we going to be a year from now if concerns about trade continue to be an irritant to growth?”

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“The biggest risk to the economy is the whole trade situation,” said Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI). “We stopped doing the regulatory burden, we have a fairer tax system … and the whole trade war has injected a huge dose of uncertainty and instability.”

One of the key problems is that the trade war is particularly hitting states where vulnerable Republicans are standing for re-election. In Maine, where Sen. Susan Collins is already more divisive than she has ever been, the trade war has decimated lobster sales. And in Iowa, Sen. Joni Ernst has to contend with the gigantic losses to farms as agricultural exports drop.

“Everyone acknowledges that the economy is good, but they are still uneasy about their own circumstances,” a Republican official working on Senate races told Politico. “I am nervous that people will lose their patience and want to start seeing results.”


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Trump ignored advice to tell country the coronavirus pandemic was ‘bad and could get very worse’ in early March: report

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According to a day-by-day examination of the White House efforts to get up to speed on dealing with the growing coronavirus pandemic that has now brought the country to an almost complete standstill, Politico reports that Donald Trump was advised in early March to warn the public things were about to get worse and chose to ignore that advice.

The report notes that the final realization about the dangerous spread of COVID-19 preceded the president's rare prime time address to the nation.

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Why the novel coronavirus became a social media nightmare

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The biggest reputational risk Facebook and other social media companies had expected in 2020 was fake news surrounding the US presidential election. Be it foreign or domestic in origin, the misinformation threat seemed familiar, perhaps even manageable.

The novel coronavirus, however, has opened up an entirely different problem: the life-endangering consequences of supposed cures, misleading claims, snake-oil sales pitches and conspiracy theories about the outbreak.

So far, AFP has debunked almost 200 rumors and myths about the virus, but experts say stronger action from tech companies is needed to stop misinformation and the scale at which it can be spread online.

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Europe, US virus deaths surge as Trump reverses New York lockdown threat

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The global coronavirus death toll surged past 30,000 over the weekend as Europe and the United States endured their darkest days of the crisis.

A back-flip from US President Donald Trump on quarantining New York highlighted the panic and confusion across many parts of the world in trying to contain the pandemic, which has seen more than a third of humanity placed under unprecedented lockdowns.

More than 30,800 deaths had been reported worldwide by Sunday, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally, as the virus continued to leave a devastating imprint on nearly every aspect of society: wiping out millions of jobs, overwhelming healthcare services and draining national treasuries.

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