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Here are 5 important things Donald Trump has done to make gun violence worse

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President Donald Trump told the press pool that he agrees “more must be done” on mass shootings. When it comes to protecting Americans, however, Trump has done more to protect the gun than gun-victims.

Here are five significant things Trump did that has made gun violence worse.

1. Giving guns to the mentally ill

One of the first things Trump’s chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, did was to blame the mass shooting on “mental illness.” Trump, too, has repeated the same claim. But one thing he did as president was to revoke an executive order President Barack Obama signed that mandated checks for those with mental illnesses before they buy a gun.

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“The rule, which was finalized in December, added people receiving Social Security checks for mental illnesses and people deemed unfit to handle their own financial affairs to the national background check database,” NBC News reported Feb. 2017.

2. Trump stopped the DOJ from using updated language about what defines “mentally ill”

Trump also froze a Department of Justice rule that would have prevented anyone “adjudicated as a mental defective” or “committed to a mental institution” from having access to a gun. Previous phrases about mental illness were so outdated that the Department of Justice ultimately proposed the fix, but Trump stopped it from being implemented.

3. Trump allowed criminals to have guns

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In 2016, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) introduced a fix to a loophole in a federal law that requires gun sellers certify that “gun storage or safety devices will be available at any place in which firearms are sold.” Cabela’s Outdoor Fund even paid for the gun locks for any gun owner. Trump stopped that too.

The FBI once barred anyone who fell under the definition of “fugitive from justice” from purchasing a weapon. Under Trump’s Department of Justice, the FBI background check only blocks a person with an arrest warrant from buying a gun, but only if they fled a state trying to evade prosecution, or were the subject of an “imminent” criminal prosecution. Anyone with an arrest warrant can score an assault rifle now.

4. Trump deleted 500,000 people previously banned from getting a gun

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There were nearly 500,000 records on people in the federal background check system who were considered fugitives. They would normally be prevented from buying a gun, but the background check database deleted their records. The records being recreated at the FBI were then forced to adhere to the new definitions of “fugitive from justice.”

“The FBI has long held that anyone who remains at large and wanted for arrest should not be allowed to purchase a weapon,” Newsweek reported at the time.

5. Trump’s 2019 budget cut funds to state background check systems

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Trump has said that he wanted to help improve background checks, but it seems he doesn’t want it bad enough to pay for the cost. In Feb. 2018, the White House released its budget proposal, which called for a $12 million cut to funds given to states to update their background check database. Just two days later, a gunman opened fire on the students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, killing 17 people.

The gun lobby spent more than $55 million to elect Donald Trump and NRA allies in Congress in 2016, Everytown for Gun Safety reported prior to the mid-term election in 2018.

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Michael Moore predicts Mick Mulvaney will get into Heaven after confessing Trump’s quid pro quo

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Academy Award-winning filmmaker Michael Moore predicted acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney will ascend to Heaven in the afterlife during a Friday interview on MSNBC's "The Beat" with Ari Melber.

The host played a clip of Mulvaney admitting Trump's quid pro quo while seeking foreign election assistance from Ukraine.

"This man obviously is going to be admitted into Heaven," Moore said. "You know, he told the truth."

"If there was a movie version of this, somebody stuck him with a needle just before he walked out onto the stage there, a truth serum needle, and he just went on and on saying, 'Yeah, that’s what we do. Yeah, of course.' Essentially admitting there is a quid pro quo. In fact, there are many quid pro quos."

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Trump campaign has 12-person ‘War Room’ toiling to fight the impeachment inquiry: report

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While the White House has bragged about refusing to start a "war room" to deal with the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump's administration, his campaign is footing the bill for a 12-person operation, the LA Times reported Friday.

“Some of you have criticized us for not having a war room — OK? — which we don’t by the way,” acting Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney told reporters.

“You don’t have a war room when you haven’t done anything wrong," he added.

By that logic, Trump's 2020 re-election campaign may fear the president did something wrong.

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‘I don’t think he knows what he’s doing’: Ex-Trump advisor rips the ‘cascading crisis’ of his ‘strategic disaster’

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President Donald Trump received harsh criticism from a former top Middle East advisor for the ethnic cleansing campaign Turkey is waging against the Kurds in Syria.

MSNBC's Chuck Todd interviewed Brett McGurk, the former special presidential envoy for the Global Coalition to Counter ISIL.

"The truth of the matter is when President Trump announced to the world last December that we were leaving Syria and he arbitrarily cut our force reportedly in half, which is already a small force, we lost all of our leverage and influence," McGurk argued. "And he really threw it out the window on this call on October 6th."

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