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Iowa’s Steve King facing ouster because his campaign is broke and his allies have fled: report

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Iowa Republican Steve King is facing losing his seat representing his district in the U.S. House of Representatives as his campaign finds itself broke and the Republican Party has turned its back on him after his latest round of controversial comments.

According to a report from the Daily Beast, his campaign is struggling to bring donors — who once wholeheartedly supported him –back into the fold.

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Even worse, his colleagues in Congress have also abandoned him.

“King has not received a single contribution this year from a political action committee associated with a sitting member of Congress. Corporate PACs and interest groups have also completely shunned him,” the Beast reports. “Through the first six months of the year, King received just two contributions from third party political entities: $2,000 donations from PACs associated with two former members of Congress, Lamar Smith (R-TX) and the infamous Todd Akin (R-MO).”

What caused the sea change in support for King, long noted for his white extremist rhetoric, was a recent question-and-answer session in Iowa where he expressed support for rape and incest as a way of propagating white populations.

As the Beast reports, King is now facing a strong primary challenge with little money on hand to fight back.

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“Those comments have made King a pariah in the party—with House Republican leaders stripping him of his committee assignments—King has refused to leave office,” the report states. “Now, as he faces the toughest campaign since he was first elected in 2002, he is doing so with a potentially catastrophic lack of resources. The $18,365 that King’s campaign had in the bank at the end of June was the least cash on hand he’s ever reported after the first six months of a cycle.”

“King’s top industry donors throughout his career, according to an analysis of Federal Election Commission records, were the American Bankers Association, the National Association of Homebuilders, AT&T, Crystal Sugars, and the Rain and Hail Insurance Society. All of them last donated to King during the 2018 election cycle but have so far declined to do so in this cycle,” the report continues while pointing out that some of those same donors are now funding his GOP challengers.

The Beast reports that King should not expect any help from his party which has already shunned him when not criticizing his latest comments.

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“Contributions from Republican Party organizations have also evaporated completely. King never relied too heavily on such donations—he generally received about $5,000 per cycle from GOP committees, with the most, about $32,000, coming during the 2010 cycle. But it appears he’ll be fighting for re-election next year without any financial assistance from his party, which is raising record sums this year,” the report states.

You can read more here.


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2020 Election

‘There are some women who’d beg to differ’: Watch CNN anchor’s epic response to sexism in politics

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On Saturday, CNN anchor S.E. Cupp gave a passionate lecture about the sexism female politicians face during political campaigns.

The host read a quote from a "top" advisor to former Vice President Joe Biden.

“I don't know of anybody who has taken as sustained and vitriolic a negative pounding as Biden ...really the most vicious press I think anyone's experienced,” the Biden advisor told Politico.

"Come again? What's that now?" Cupp asked in disbelief.

"I think there are some women who beg to differ," she noted.

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2020 Election

‘Obstructionist-in-chief’ McConnell pilloried by conservative scholar with plea for Kentucky voters to dump him

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In a column for the conservative Bulwark, a former assistant U.S. Attorney who worked with under Ken Starr during the Whitewater investigation implored Kentucky voters to dump Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, saying he has used the rules of the Senate to crown himself king.

According to Kimberly Wehle, a professor at the University of Baltimore School of Law, McConnell has used his ascension to the majority leader's spot to become the "obstructionist-in-chief."

Pointing at a government that appears frozen in place, Wehle wrote, "Voters are pointing fingers, variously, at House Democrats, Republican senators, federal agencies, the federal judiciary, their state and local counterparts, and of course Donald J. Trump himself," before adding, "Much of the logjam in government falls at the feet of a single man whose power does not stem from the Constitution at all. As Senate Majority Leader, Mitch McConnell has repeatedly and single-handedly flouted the will of the people and the prerogatives of his governmental counterparts otherwise mandated by the U.S. Constitution."

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2020 Election

Why won’t Democrats say they want government to solve problems?

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All 10 Democratic candidates in the Houston debate Sept. 13 spoke about investing public money – taxpayer dollars – in education, health care and economic opportunity for Americans. Those ideas depend on an underlying point none of them came out and said directly: Government can help citizens live better lives and achieve their dreams.

Why won’t Democrats come out and say that government is, or at least can be, good?

Crisis of distrust

The 2020 presidential campaign is happening in an America facing a historic crisis of public trust in political leaders, branches of government and each other. Andrew Yang, an entrepreneur seeking the Democratic nomination, said it directly on the stage: “We don’t trust our institutions anymore.”

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