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Trump is a ‘paranoid, delusional individual’ who ‘can’t do much about anything’: Congressman

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On CNN’s “The Situation Room” on Monday, Rep. Steve Cohen (D-TN) laid into President Donald Trump, calling him a “paranoid, delusional individual” who is steering America into the ground with his personal demons.

Americans, Cohen said, need to come “to grips with the fact that we have a leader who is not capable of leading this country. The economy is in danger because the president has no clue. He doesn’t have an economist. He’s got a TV commentator. They don’t know what to do.”

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“I’ve been with some of the leaders around the world in the last several months, and they are pretty much the folks I’ve been with, and top financial people concerned about the United States going it alone with the tariffs on China that they think will harm the world economy, rather than acting in concert with our allies, and they have no faith in Trump, and I have no faith in Trump.”

“Truth of the matter is, my father was a psychiatrist,” added Cohen, “I think about him often, and I think he should be here today rather than me, because when you listen to that previous report you had, that’s a paranoid, delusional individual, blaming even Fox News and the media for the problems with the economy and saying everything’s fine and everything’s wonderful. There is an interview I just read back from 1990 where Trump cavalierly said depressions occur in the economy on a regular basis and there is not much you can do about them. Well, he can’t do much about anything.”

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Congress still has one big tool left to rein in Trump’s corruption: Oversight Committee Democrat

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Senate Republicans may have managed to quash the impeachment trial without calling forth any new witnesses or seriously considering the evidence against President Donald Trump. And the president may feel vindicated and largely invulnerable as a result.

But, Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL) told CNN's Anderson Cooper on Monday, that doesn't mean Democrats don't have one last big play to rein in the president's abuses of power. They can use the first and strongest authority delegated to them: the power of the purse.

"What can Democrats really do when it comes to oversight of the president?" asked Cooper. "I mean, now that impeachment is over, does seem like there are fewer and fewer guardrails, if any."

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The depths of Trump’s paranoia: One person who may know him the best explains what’s ahead

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President Donald Trump's biographer, Michael d'Antonio, knows a great deal about his life, his behavior, and his long history of paranoia. A piece in The New York Times Monday summed up the president's state of mind during the impeachment with one word: "paranoid."

Speaking to the long history of paranoia, d'Antonio recalled that in Trump's book The Art of the Comeback, he wrote ten tips for an effective comeback. No. 3, he said, was "be paranoid."

"He thinks that paranoia is an effective strategy when it comes to managing people and when it comes to doing business," said the biographer. "And I think all of the attitudes that we see him bring into the presidency are things that evidence themselves early in his life. So, he's never trusted people very readily and is very quick to identify someone as an enemy. And then try to root out those who aren't loyal enough. So paranoia is something that's always been a trait for the president, and he considers it a useful, even constructive thing."

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Trump lawyer goes down in flames trying to explain away Bill Barr’s corruption

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On Monday's edition of CNN's "Anderson Cooper 360," former federal prosecutor Elie Honig took former Trump White House lawyer Jim Schultz to the cleaners when he tried to defend Attorney General William Barr's conduct.

Schultz initially tried to claim that the 2,000 federal prosecutors calling for Barr's resignation had a political axe to grind. "You have a lot of folks that have a partisan agenda pushing this thing out, before the facts have really, have really been discovered, as it relates to what happened," said Schultz. "And Barr is vehement about stating that, you know, that decision was made long before any of the tweets, long before — and before the president made my statements on this matter ... he has to have the trust in the folks that are working below him."

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