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Fox & Friends pushes lies and distortions about intel whistleblower: ‘Almost as if they heard a rumor’

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“Fox & Friends” co-host Steve Doocy pushed inaccurate claims about a whistleblower complaint filed by an intelligence official against President Donald Trump.

The Fox News broadcaster downplayed the complaint, which reportedly involved Trump’s efforts to pressure Ukraine’s president to dig up dirt against Joe Biden, and falsely claimed that Congress had no authority to investigate.

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“In this country, you know, we’ve heard a lot over the last couple of years about how the Democrats would like to impeach the president of the United States,” Doocy said, and co-host Brian Kilmeade feigned shock.

“Now, given the fact that we’ve got this Ukraine thing and then the whistleblower thing,” Doocy continued, “and by the way, did you hear the whistleblower complaint was filed by somebody who actually had no direct knowledge of it? It’s almost as if they had heard a rumor and filed it, and that apparently is why it does not fall into the standards for the intel whistleblower, law and that’s why it’s not going to Congress.”

In fact, the inspector general for the intelligence community found the complaint to be of “urgent concern,” which then passed the complaint on to the director of national intelligence — who has failed to share the report with the House Intelligence Committee, as required by law.

Doocy speculated what Trump’s acting director of national intelligence would say to justify his decision to withhold the complaint, but the Fox News broadcaster framed that guess as established fact.

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“According to the stories this morning,” Doocy said, “because the whistleblower was not in the room, did actually not see it, heard about it, and made this thing and said this is serious and urgent, which normally triggers an investigation.”

The inspector general, and not the whistleblower, determined the complaint was an urgent concern, which is a legal requirement under the 1998 statute.

“(They) didn’t get it because they had no direct knowledge, did not meet the standard,” Doocy claimed, inaccurately. “That is probably what the acting director of national intelligence is going to say on Thursday.”

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Former Trump pal Donny Deutsch explains the president’s gamble on impeachment

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MSNBC's Donny Deutsch has a theory about his old pal President Donald Trump and his latest strategy to wriggle out of trouble.

The "Morning Joe" contributor suspects the president, whom he used to know from their days in New York City, believes impeachment is inevitable, but he's confident that Republican senators won't remove him from office.

"Rev, I'm seeing a little bit of a different show here," Deutsch told the Rev. Al Sharpton. "You and I know Trump pretty well, or used to know Trump pretty well. I don't think there's any chance Mick Mulvaney went out there on his own."

Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, admitted during a press briefing that he held up congressionally approved aid to Ukraine in an effort to press the country to investigate a conspiracy theory about Democrats and the 2016 election.

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Mick Mulvaney is Trump’s new fall guy on corruption — and Republicans just play along

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It's getting increasingly more difficult to keep track of all the new impeachable acts President Trump commits every day. And perhaps even more difficult to imagine the most outrageous thing he can do that the Republican Party would still defend.

This article first appeared in Salon.

It took almost two weeks, but the White House has finally admitting what everyone knew from day one: Trump demanded a quid pro quo from the Ukrainian government before releasing military aid authorized by Congress. Republicans have been denying the obvious, remaining willfully blind to a brazen scheme. That suddenly seems quaint, now that acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney has confessed on live television that there was a quid pro quo.

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The week Donald Trump’s presidency crashed and burned — and Republicans noticed

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It feels as though every week during the Trump administration is a year and every year a decade. Every day there is a crisis or an outrage or a revelation that takes your breath away. But the underlying dynamics always seem to be the same no matter what. The press reports the story, the Democrats get outraged, the pundits analyze it, the president rages and then Fox and the Republicans all line up like a bunch of robots and salute smartly. Then we reset until the next crisis, outrage or revelation. It's an exhausting cycle that never seems to get us anywhere and it's bred a fatalistic response in many of us: "Nothing matters."

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