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‘Huge win’ but ‘not enough’: Amazon workers claim credit for pushing Bezos on climate, vow to intensify campaign

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“Today, we celebrate. Tomorrow, we’ll be in the streets.”

Amazon workers who plan to walk off the job Friday in support of the Global Climate Strike celebrated the power of employee pressure on Thursday as CEO Jeff Bezos released a plan to combat the climate crisis—even as they and outside critics noted that the paltry proposal shows the world’s richest man still doesn’t get it when it comes to the planetary emergency.

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“Yes! The worst time to cave is when they are just getting scared!”
—Naomi Klein, author
Bezos said the company plans to reduce its carbon emissions over the next two decades, becoming carbon-neutral by 2040. Amazon’s operations will run on 80 percent renewable energy by 2024 according to the pledge, and Bezos plans to use electric vehicles for deliveries and regularly report on Amazon’s emissions.

Amazon Employees for Climate Justice, the coalition that includes more than 15,000 workers who plan to strike on Friday, said the release of the plan demonstrates the importance and power of direct action.

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Bezos stressed that under the plan, Amazon is scheduled to reach its goal ten years ahead of the timeline the Paris climate agreement put forward for world governments in 2015—but Amazon workers noted that the Paris accord’s originally stated goals are insufficient to avert climate catastrophe and called on their company to put forward a more aggressive plan.

“Amazon’s Climate Pledge is a huge win for Amazon Employees for Climate Justice and we’re thrilled at what workers have achieved in under a year,” the group tweeted. “But we know it’s not enough. The Paris Agreement, by itself, won’t get us to a livable world. Today, we celebrate. Tomorrow, we’ll be in the streets.”

As outlined in the demands they released earlier this month, Amazon workers want the company to cut all carbon emissions by 2030.

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Author and Climate Strike supporter Naomi Klein applauded the employees for continuing to apply pressure to the company.

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Greenpeace welcomed Bezos’s pledge to help meet the Paris agreement’s goal of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, but demanded transparency from the company about its carbon emissions.

“While the purchasing of one hundred thousand electric vans is certainly more than a token investment, Amazon is still one of the few companies who have not published its carbon footprint,” said Gary Cook, senior corporate campaigner at Greenpeace USA. “We are still missing how fast its emissions are rising and a sense of what effort is needed to achieve these commitments.”

“Throwing money at carbon offsets and continuing to support the oil giants find even more oil is an early indication that Jeff Bezos doesn’t understand the transition that is needed.”
—Gary Cook, Greenpeace

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Bezos said earlier this year that Amazon would disclose its carbon emission levels by the end of 2019, but the company has yet to do so.

Cook also questioned Amazon’s level of commitment to reigning in all the emissions it contributes to, both directly and indirectly, considering its relationships with the oil and gas sector.

“Throwing money at carbon offsets and continuing to support the oil giants find even more oil is an early indication that Jeff Bezos doesn’t understand the transition that is needed,” Cook said.

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Pompeo State Dept. homepage advocates ‘being a Christian leader’ — here’s why that’s more disturbing than it sounds

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The website of the U.S, Department of State currently features a photograph of Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and the words, “Being a Christian Leader.”

The link on the State Dept. homepage goes to a video and the text of Pompeo’s speech to the American Association of Christian Counselors in Nashville, Tennessee on October 11.

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Russia denies US news report it bombed 4 Syria hospitals in 12 hours

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Russia on Monday denied a US newspaper report that its warplanes bombed four hospitals in rebel-held territory in Syria over a period of 12 hours this year.

The Russian defence ministry rubbished the claim in a report by The New York Times, saying "the alleged 'evidence' provided by the NYT is not worth even the paper it was printed on".

The May strikes -- which the newspaper tied to Moscow through Russian radio recordings, plane spotter logs and accounts by witnesses -- are part of a larger pattern of medical facilities targeted by forces supporting Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in the country's devastating civil war.

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Black family arrested for ‘loitering’ on their own front lawn

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On October 1, a black family was standing in the front yard of their home, when police approached. They were arrested for loitering even though they were on their own property, reports KYW news.

Loitering offenses have historically been used as a way to purge people seen as undesirable, such as the homeless, from public spaces.

Now, the family is demanding answers from the Chester Township Police Department in Pennsylvania.

"It's a terrifying thing. It makes me feel as though the police can knock down your door, and drag you out of your home at anytime," Rachel Briggs told KYW. "This is an incident that made me feel like I'm a prisoner in my own home," she added. Her sons and nephew were dragged off to jail, where they spent the night while the family scrambled to make their bail.

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