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These are the circumstances that could actually force Trump to resign: history professor

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It’s highly unlikely — though not impossible — that President Donald Trump could step down to avoid being thrown out of office.

House Democrats have launched a formal impeachment inquiry that’s already gathered new public support, but Trump’s history suggests he’ll fight to the bitter end — no matter what it costs the nation, according to CNN political analyst Julian Zelizer, a professor of history and public affairs at Princeton University.

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“The prospects of Trump ending his career rather than forcing others to do it for him — either Congress or the electorate — seem remote,” Zelizer argued. “Trump loves a fight and seems to be revved up by the prospect of taking on the Democratic House.”

Trump loves to feel like he’s punching back, and he seems to think he’s entering the impeachment fight with the full support of the Republican Party.

“With memories of the 1998 midterms, when the electorate punished the GOP for impeaching President Bill Clinton, Trump is betting that voters will turn against the Democrats rather than him, putting him in an even stronger position by Election Day,” Zelizer wrote.

But some observers believe he could eventually be forced to abandon the fight if resignation is all that’s left to keep him from being prosecuted upon leaving office.

“If Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell met with Trump to deliver the news that his colleagues would not support the administration should a trial prove that articles of impeachment were sound, the President would suddenly be the one sitting on the other end of the boardroom table about to be told, ‘You’re fired!'” Zelizer wrote.

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Right now, congressional Republicans have signaled they support the president, but eventually the pressure to turn on Trump may become too great, Zelizer wrote.

“The power of partisanship on which Trump has depended might turn against him if the party no longer sees him as being in its best interests,” Zelizer wrote. “More than good conscience or realism, the loss of Republican support in the Senate will be the only development that can leave President Trump standing alone, with no choice but to step down.”

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‘This is not how words work’: Trump trashed after ranting that Roger Stone will be ‘exonerated’

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President Donald Trump went off on a strange rant after the sentence was handed down in the Roger Stone case.

Trump was supposed to be speaking about his new system of pardons which would pass down recommendations, but instead, he wanted to talk about those he felt should be prosecuted instead of Stone.

"But it happened to Roger Stone, and it happened to Gen. Flynn. and it happened to -- I won't name names," Trump continued during his Hope for Prisoners commencement address. "I know Roger but a lot of people know Roger. Everybody sort of knows Roger. And what happened to him is unbelievable. They say he lied. But other people lied, too. Just to mention [James] Comey lied. [Andrew] McCabe lied. Lisa Page lied. Her lover Strzok, Peter Strzok, lied. You don't know who these people are? Trust me. They all lied."

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Trump’s praise for Dana Rohrabacher comes back to haunt him after ex-congressman confirms offering pardon deal to Julian Assange

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Former Republican Rep. Dana Rohrabacher of California confirmed a shocking revelation to Yahoo News on Thursday — that he had offered a pardon to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in 2017 if he publicly disputed the notion that Russia had hacked the Democratic National Committee.

The offer was first reported on Wednesday when Assange’s lawyers revealed the exchange in a British court.

But while Rohrabacher confirmed that he presented Assange with the idea, he said President Donald Trump was not aware of the possible pardon. Instead, Rohrabacher said that he discussed the pardon with then-White House Chief of Staff John Kelly after the Assange meeting. But while Kelly was “courteous,” Rohrabacher said, they never broached the topic again, and there’s no indication Trump was even made aware of it.

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Trump was ‘furious’ with his last acting intel chief for giving election security briefing to House Dems: report

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President Donald Trump's surprise decision to appoint loyalist Richard Grenell as his next acting Director of National Intelligence came after his previous acting DNI, Joseph Maguire, enraged him by giving an intelligence briefing to House Democrats.

The Washington Post reports that Trump was "furious" at Maguire after learning that Shelby Pierson, the top intelligence official on election security, gave a briefing to the Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA)-led House Intelligence Committee.

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