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What is the cryosphere? Hint: It’s vital to farming, fishing and skiing

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More than 100 scientists from 30 countries will soon release a special report examining climate change impacts on the oceans and a less familiar but critically important part of the Earth: the cryosphere.

Ice sheets, ice caps and glaciers, the floating sea ice of the polar regions, lake ice, snow on the ground, and permafrost, permanently frozen ground in northern latitudes, all make up the cryosphere.

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While snow and ice in our daily lives can, at times, be difficult to navigate and sometimes dangerous, people benefit greatly from the cryosphere. It helps cool our planet and controls global sea level. It affects ocean currents and storm patterns around the world. The fresh water stored in snow and ice provides drinking water and irrigates crops. I am a researcher who studies snow and ice, and the fact that the Earth is beginning to lose its cryosphere as a result of global warming climate should concern all of us.

Fresh water locked in massive ice sheets

The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets contain 99% of the freshwater ice on the planet. These ice sheets, glaciers and ice caps around the world are losing mass and are contributing to sea level rise, putting coastal regions and low-lying islands around the world at risk.

The Tibetan Plateau is known as the “water tower” of Asia. The Mekong River, Yellow River, the Yangthze, Indus River and the Karnali all originate on the Tibetan plateau and are fed by snow and glacier melt and the water from these rivers supports hundreds of millions of people.

More locally, in the U.S. Mountain West, including the Cascades, Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains, the winter snowpack, water stored as ice and snow until spring, is the major source of water for agriculture, industry and municipal use. Like the ice sheets in the polar regions, evidence shows that the winter snowpack in the U.S. is shrinking. The economic impact to communities without enough cold weather and snow is numerous, whether it is a loss of winter sports such as skiing, snowmobiling and ice fishing or less water for fish or irrigation to grow food.

Mt Rainier in the Cascade Mountain range.
Ted S. Warren/AP

The threats of our shrinking cryosphere involve much more than impacts to local and regional economies, however. Much of our planet’s snow and ice, located in the polar regions, is there because it is so cold. The bright white snow and ice cover functions like a mirror for the planet, reflecting back into space much of the Sun’s energy that reaches the surface. The snow and ice reinforce the cold of the polar regions and their role as our planet’s natural refrigerators. A warming Earth undermines the ability of snow and ice to moderate and stabilize the global climate.

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The impact of thinning ice

In the Arctic, the North Polar region of Earth, much of the ocean is covered by floating sea ice, which forms when sea water freezes. This sea ice cover is shrinking. As the ice thins and melts, darker surfaces are exposed and absorb more of the Sun’s energy. This leads to more warming and even more melting. This cycle of heat absorption, warming and melting, known as a positive feedback, is a factor in Arctic amplification – the observation that the Arctic is warming at least twice as quickly the rate as the globe as a whole.

The loss of the floating sea ice cover and the rapidly warming Arctic are causing a cascade effect through the Arctic food chain – from top predators like the polar bear to tiny phytoplankton that live throughout the world’s oceans. The lives of the 4 million people who live in the Arctic are being disrupted in myriad ways.

The Greenland ice sheet releases tons of fresh water.

The ice-diminished Arctic is opening up potential shipping lanes including the northern sea route along the Russian coast and the Northwest Passage through the channels of the Canadian Arctic archipelago, all islands north of Canada except Greenland. Oil and natural gas deposits under the Arctic seafloor are becoming more accessible. The potential for economic development in the region brings with it inevitable challenges of governance and conflict.

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The global ice budget

But what is happening in the north won’t just stay there. As the Arctic warms, it may disrupt the jet stream, the narrow band of strong west to east winds high in the atmosphere that influences weather, the tracks and intensity of storms in the middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. Some scientists say that this is already happening.

And, as the Arctic’s permafrost thaws, Arctic land will release stored carbon, in the form of carbon dioxide, and methane back to the atmosphere, potentially leading to further climate warming. The melting Greenland ice sheet is contributing to sea level rise in addition to melting Arctic ice caps and glaciers.

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As our climate gets hotter, the cryosphere will continue to shrink and melt, and the impacts of losing it will likely only multiply. What we see today is just the beginning.

[ Like what you’ve read? Want more? Sign up for The Conversation’s daily newsletter. ]The Conversation

Mark Serreze, Research Professor of Geography and Director, National Snow and Ice Data Center, University of Colorado Boulder

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This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.


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‘There is no managing Donald Trump’: White House Republicans blasted for their myth of ‘adults in the room’

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Republicans who thought they could manage Donald Trump were taken down in The New Yorker on Tuesday.

The Susan Glasser article was titled, "The spectacular failure of the Trump wranglers."

"On Tuesday, nearly seven hours into the marathon third day of public impeachment hearings, Kurt Volker tried to explain to the House Intelligence Committee what it was like to carry out the nearly impossible task of wrangling U.S. policy toward Ukraine during the Presidency of Donald Trump," Glasser wrote. "Volker, a veteran Republican diplomat who had been serving, since 2017, as Trump’s Special Representative to Ukraine, said that he realized last spring that he had a 'problem,' and that it was Trump himself.

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BUSTED: Trump’s White House sent out anti-Vindman talking points — trashing their own staffer

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President Donald Trump's war on his own employees escalated on Tuesday when the White House spread talking points designed to result in a coordinated attack on a decorated active-duty Army officer.

"The Trump White House has taken the extraordinary step of distributing talking points to allies of the president trashing one of its employees," The Daily Beast reported after obtaining a copy of the document.

"On Tuesday morning, White House aide Julia Hahn emailed Trump surrogates under the subject line, “Vindman’s Complaints Are Nothing More Than Policy Disagreements,” according to messages reviewed by The Daily Beast. Hahn, a Steve Bannon protege and one of his former allies in the White House, works on outreach and communications involving pro-Trump talking heads and other players in conservative media," The Beast reported.

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Don Lemon notes the GOP panic after their own witnesses gave testimony harming Trump: ‘Worried much?’

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CNN anchor Don Lemon explained how witnesses called by Republicans in the impeachment inquiry destoryed the defenses employed by President Donald Trump and his allies.

"Now, let's just be honest, the shakedown -- that's exactly what it is -- the shakedown is exposed, people," Lemon said.

"And the evidence comes from the Republican's own witnesses," he noted. "The former envoy to Ukraine, Kurt Volker -- who resigned just one day after the release of the whistleblower's report -- telling the president's defenders exactly what they did not want to hear."

"They called him apparently expecting him to say what he said in his closed-door testimony, that he saw no evidence of a quid pro quo, or let's call it for what it is again -- a shakedown," he continued. "Well, now he says he was wrong."

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