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California turns off power to millions to prevent wildfires

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Rolling blackouts set to affect millions of Californians began Wednesday as a utility company started switching off power to an unprecedented number of households in the face of hot, windy weather that raises the risk of wildfires.

Pacific Gas & Electric, which announced the deliberate outage, is working to prevent a repeat of a catastrophe last November in which faulty power lines it owned were determined to have sparked California’s deadliest wildfire in modern history.

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California governor Gavin Newsom said the “frustration that Californians feel as they deal with the impacts of these power outages is warranted,” but that safety was the main concern.

“Our first priority is to protect people and to ensure that communities are safe,” he added in a statement.

In last year’s inferno, 86 people died and a town called Paradise was virtually destroyed. PG&E has been found responsible for dozens of other wildfires in recent years, too.

This is peak wildfire season in California.

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“Extremely critical” fire conditions were expected in parts of northern California Wednesday, and in southern California around Los Angeles county Thursday, the National Weather Service said.

PG&E said the severe weather incident prompting its precautionary shutoffs — hot, dry conditions and winds gusting at up to 70 mph (110 kph) — was expected to last through mid-day Thursday in northern and central California.

AFP/File / Josh Edelson On November 11, 2018 a helicopter makes a water drop on the wildfires in the Feather River Canyon, east of Paradise, California

The outages already affecting regions such as the Napa Valley wine country could last up to a week in some places. Some 800,000 customers will lose power, meaning around two million people will be affected in the planned PG&E outages.

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The city of San Francisco is not affected by the intentional shutoff but much of the surrounding Bay Area could go dark including parts of Silicon Valley.

Officials in Malibu — the glitzy home to Hollywood stars, which was also struck by last year’s inferno — said power company Southern California Edison had warned of another possible shutoff in areas from late Thursday through Friday.

More than 100,000 customers could lose power across eight Southern California counties, SCE said.

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– ‘Excessive’ –

AFP/File / Josh Edelson Power lines are seen on November 11, 2018 against a smoky landscape near Pulga, California, east of Paradise, California

Schools and universities closed Wednesday and people stocked up on gasoline, water, batteries and other basics.

“Early indicators are that the campus outage will last up to 48 hours,” said University of California Berkeley, announcing all classes were cancelled.

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With frustration rising, California state senator Jerry Hill described the mass blackouts as “excessive” in their scale.

“This cannot be something that can be acceptable nor long-term,” Hill told the Los Angeles Times.

“This is third world, and we are not,” he added.

Daniel Swain, a climate scientist at UCLA in Los Angeles, tweeted that the power shutoffs were “a necessary bad idea in the short term” that shifts the financial costs from the power companies to the public.

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GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA/AFP/File / JUSTIN SULLIVAN In this photo taken on August 5, 2019 a view of the Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) Wildfire Safety Operations Center is seen in San Francisco, California

The first part of PG&E power cuts began midnight Tuesday into Wednesday in northern California. It affected more than 500,000 customers there, the utility company said.

The rest of the San Francisco Bay area was to start losing power in waves around noon local time.

A possible third phase could take place later in the day farther south.

PG&E said it expected to start turning the power back on Thursday but can only do so after inspecting its equipment for damage, which could take days in some areas.

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This pro-Trump pastor is now praying for impeachment after watching Republicans ‘sell their souls to the devil’

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A conservative Florida pastor says he has prayed for the impeachment of President Donald Trump.

The outspoken and frequently controversial Rev. O’Neal Dozier voted for Trump in 2016 and thanked God for his victory during a GOP event shortly after the election, but he has turned on the president and the Republican Party, reported the Orlando Sun-Sentinel.

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President Trump's prospects for a second term are threatened by two kinds of people: Those "who have either had enough of him or are being forced by subpoena to share what they’ve seen," according to a new Washington Post opinion piece by Paul Waldman.

Waldman writes that it isn't Trump's top administration officials who are threatening his presidency; it's the lesser known professionals who are "so distant from the Oval Office that Trump probably doesn’t even know they exist" -- one example being former US Ambassador to Ukraine, Marie Yovanovitch.

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OANN anchor goes down in flames for reporting Christopher Columbus saved natives with Christianity

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One America News Network anchor Liz Wheeler took on history this week when she suggested that Christopher Columbus actually ended atrocities against Native Americans by bringing Christianity to America.

In a series of eye-popping tweets on Monday, Wheeler decided to celebrate Columbus Day by whitewashing the explorer's legacy.

"Christopher Columbus didn't commit genocide," she wrote. "Within 200 years of Columbus's arrival, 95% of the 20M Native Americans died... from disease. Smallpox, flu, tuberculosis, malaria, plague, measles, cholera."

"Tragic, definitely. But mass murder by Columbus? Not even close," Wheeler added.

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