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Clinton drops a stunning claim: Russia is grooming a 2020 Democrat to launch third-party presidential run

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Hillary Clinton just dropped a bombshell. The former 2016 Democratic presidential nominee who won the popular vote by close to 3 million more votes than the current president is accusing Russia of grooming a current 2020 Democrat, specifically a woman, to launch a third party run for the White House – to ensure Donald Trump wins re-election.

Russia knows they “they can’t win without a third-party candidate,” Clinton told David Plouffe on his podcast Campaign HQ, as Mediaite reports.

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“I think they’ve got their eye somebody who’s currently in the Democratic primary and are grooming her to be the third-party candidate. She’s a favorite of the Russians,” Clinton said. “They have a bunch of sites and bots and other ways of supporting her so far.”

The former U.S. Secretary of State and former U.S. Senator said she’s “not making any predictions,” and added, “I don’t know who it’s going to be but I will guarantee you they will have a vigorous third-party challenge in the key states where they most need it.”

Third party candidates have a long history of taking votes away from mainstream candidates, and at the very least reducing their margin of victory. According to History.com, Ross Perot in 1992 took 19% of the vote, giving Bill Clinton a win but with just 43% of the popular vote. And in 2000, some say Ralph Nader’s third-party run stole the election from Al Gore and handed it – with the help of the Supreme Court – to George W. Bush.

In the three states that gave Trump the narrowest of victories, throwing the 2016 Electoral College win to him, third party candidate votes made all the difference – with just 77,000 votes across three states.

For example, in Wisconsin, Gary Johnson won 106,674 votes. Trump beat Clinton by just 22,748 votes. In Pennsylvania, Gary Johnson won 146,715 votes. Trump beat Clinton by just 44,292 votes. And in Michigan, Gary Johnson won 172,136 votes. Trump beat Clinton by just 10,704 votes. Those numbers don’t even include votes for Green Party nominee Jill Stein – who Hillary Clinton, while speaking with Plouffe, labeled a “Russian asset.”

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2020 Election

Trump gambling his presidency on a voting group that may no longer exist

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President Donald Trump is betting that his law-and-order scare tactics will energize white suburban voters -- but that demographic may no longer exist as it once did.

The president remains popular in rural areas, and he won over suburban voters by 4 percent in 2016, and Trump and his Republican allies are betting he can turn out non-college educated whites who may be disgusted by police violence but don't support protests, reported Politico.

“There’s a lot of concern about the way the Minneapolis police acted,” said former Rep. Tom Davis, a seven-term Republican from the northern Virginia suburbs. “But whenever you start looting — and now the stuff’s spread out to Leesburg, it’s in Manassas … the politics takes a different turn.”

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2020 Election

‘One racist down. Hundreds in office to go’: Applause as Steve King is ousted in Iowa primary

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"Goodbye, Rep. Steve King. You are certainly not the only white supremacist in federal government, but you were among the most prominent," tweeted Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

While acknowledging that the important work of ridding Congress of racist lawmakers is far from finished, progressives celebrated the ouster of white supremacist Rep. Steve King in Iowa's Republican primary Tuesday as a significant victory and a step in the right direction.

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2020 Election

Amid pandemic, White House race becomes digital dogfight

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The 2020 US presidential race is becoming a digital-first campaign as the coronavirus pandemic cuts candidates off from traditional organizing and in-person events.

On the surface, President Donald Trump has the edge over Democrat Joe Biden because of the incumbent's extensive digital infrastructure and large social media following.

But Biden has been stepping up his digital presence and is getting a boost from a handful of outside organizations seeking to counter Trump's messaging on social platforms.

Both sides agree that digital will play a critical role in the 2020 White House race as social media have taken the place of rallies and door-to-door campaigning.

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