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Law professor urges House Democrats to get serious — and arrest Rudy Giuliani

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Faced with an intransigent White House unwilling to cooperate with an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump’s pressuring of the Ukrainian government to investigate his political rival former Vice President Joe Biden, the House should take aggressive action including arresting Rudy Giuliani, a law professor argues in a column for The New York Times Thursday.

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“The answer is unlikely to be found in a courtroom,” writes law professor Josh Chafetz.

The White House has repeatedly refused to answer subpoenas and on Tuesday afternoon, as Common Dreams reported, announced in an eight page letter that the administration will flatly refuse to cooperate in the inquiry, a move that could set up a constitutional crisis.

“There is no legal basis for Trump’s position,” NBC analyst Katie Phang said on Twitter Tuesday. “Hard stop.”

House Democrats need to think outside the box, Chafetz argues.

Faced with an intransigent White House unwilling to cooperate with an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump’s pressuring of the Ukrainian government to investigate his political rival former Vice President Joe Biden, the House should take aggressive action including arresting Rudy Giuliani, a law professor argues in a column for The New York Times Thursday.

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“The answer is unlikely to be found in a courtroom,” writes law professor Josh Chafetz.

The White House has repeatedly refused to answer subpoenas and on Tuesday afternoon, as Common Dreams reported, announced in an eight page letter that the administration will flatly refuse to cooperate in the inquiry, a move that could set up a constitutional crisis.

“There is no legal basis for Trump’s position,” NBC analyst Katie Phang said on Twitter Tuesday. “Hard stop.”

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House Democrats need to think outside the box, Chafetz argues.

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On Thursday, Common Dreams reported that two associates of Giuliani’s were arrested for campaign finance violations due to their contributions to Trump in 2016 and 2018.

A number of legal observers endorsed the theoretical framing of Chafetz’s piece while urging readers to manage expectations.

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“An aggressive strategy might work in Congress’s favor, or it might backfire,” tweeted George Mason University political science professor Jennifer N. Victory. “We cannot underestimate the importance of public reaction for providing legitimacy to government actions when we’re in uncharted water.”

University of Denver professor Seth Masket said he saw the logic in that but inaction could prove more costly.

“Agreed that this is a risky strategy, but the idea of doing nothing, and letting congressional subpoenas become voluntary, is likely far more dangerous in the long run,” said Masket.

In his conclusion, Chafetz recognizes the pitfalls of an aggressive approach, but posits that taking such an action is necessary given the administration’s behavior.

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“In the end, whether the House wins that fight, like whether it wins a fight over arresting a contemnor, would be a function of which side best convinces the public,” writes Chafetz. “But President Trump is deeply unpopular, and the public supports impeachment. If necessary, the House should be willing to have these fights.”


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DC mayor trolls Trump by lighting ‘Black Lives Matter Plaza: ‘We turned on the night light for him’

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2020 Election

It’s Donald Trump vs Joe Biden: Associate Press reports former VP has clinched the DNC nomination

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The 2020 general election campaign between two top parties has unofficially been set.

"Joe Biden formally clinched the Democratic presidential nomination Friday, setting him up for a bruising challenge to President Donald Trump that will play out against the unprecedented backdrop of a pandemic, economic collapse and civil unrest," the AP reported Friday. "The former vice president has effectively been his party’s leader since his last challenger in the Democratic primary, Bernie Sanders, ended his campaign in April. But Biden pulled together the 1,991 delegates needed to become the nominee after seven states and the District of Columbia held presidential primaries Tuesday."

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Trump retweets right-wing video attacking George Floyd’s character — hours after calling it a ‘great day’ for Floyd

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On Friday, President Donald Trump retweeted a video from right-wing commentator Glenn Beck, which appeared to question the wisdom of calling George Floyd a "hero" — and concurring with Black GOP commentator Candace Owens, who said it "sickens me" he is being "held up as a martyr."

Disgusting. pic.twitter.com/JCJWEFYZww

— David Gura (@davidgura) June 6, 2020

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