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Audience breaks into applause as Vindman explains why he’s not afraid of testifying against Trump

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Republican efforts to undermine Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman apparently failed to persuade the audience in the impeachment hearing room.

The National Security Council staffer was showered with applause after reading the closing portions of his opening statement for a second time at the request of Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-NY).

“Can you read the last paragraph for me again, the second-to-last one, can you read that again for me?” Maloney said. “I think the American public deserves to have it again.”

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Vindman agreed, and said his father would probably appreciate that.

“Dad, my sitting here today in the U.S. Capitol, talking to our elected officials, is proof that you made the right decision 40 years ago to leave the Soviet Union and come here to the United States of America in search of a better life for our family,” Vindman said. “Do not worry, I’ll be fine for telling the truth.”

Maloney asked if he understood the risk he was taking coming forward to testify against President Donald Trump.

“You realize when you came forward out of sense of duty, that you were putting yourself in direct opposition to the most powerful person in the world,” Maloney said. “Do you realize that, sir?”

Vindman agreed that he understood that risk, and Maloney asked him about another portion of his opening statement.

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“I’m struck by the word, that phrase, ‘do not worry,’ you addressed to your dad,” the lawmaker said. “Was your dad a warrior?”

Vindman said he had served in another country’s military, and he would have worried about his son taking on such a huge risk.

“He deeply worried about it,” Vindman said. “In his context, there was — there was the ultimate risk.”

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Maloney asked why the lieutenant colonel felt confident enough to assure his father.

“Congressman, because this is America,” Vindman said. “This is the country I have served and defended, that all of my brothers have served and here, right matters.”

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Maloney thanked him, and the crowd broke into about seven seconds of applause.

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Cheerleader who was punished for taking a knee during football game wins $145K settlement

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A former cheerleader for Kennesaw State University who took a knee during the National Anthem during a football game has been paid $145,000 in an out-of-court settlement, according to the Marietta Daily Journal.

Tommia Dean sued KSU’s then-President Sam Olens, alongside Scott Whitlock and Matt Griffin who worked for the KSU athletics department at the time, after her public protest with four other cheerleaders which took place in 2017. She dropped her lawsuit after settling with the Georgia Department of Administrative Services for $145,000.

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Trump appointee flails in Senate hearing as he tries to explain contradictory Pentagon statements

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In the wake of news reports that the Trump administration is considering sending an additional 14,000 troops to the Middle East, potentially doubling the current amount of US troops sent to the region since May, the Pentagon's attempts to deny the revelations aren't going to well, according to Task & Purpose.

In a statement, Pentagon spokesperson Alyssa Farah said that there are no plans for a troop increase "at this time."

"As discussed in the hearing today, we are constantly evaluating the threat situation around the world and considering our options," Farah said. "We adjust our force posture and troop levels based on adversary action and the dynamic security situation. Secretary Esper spoke to Chairman Inhofe this morning and reaffirmed that we are not considering sending 14,000 additional troops to the Middle East at this time."

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‘Make America 36th Out of 41 Developed Nations Again’: Social justice index of developed nations puts US near bottom

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Meanwhile, the democratic-socialist Nordic countries of Iceland, Norway, Denmark, Finland, and Sweden enjoy the top spots in detailed survey of OECD nations.

Not dead last, but close to it.

That's where the United States came out in a new survey of the world's 41 highly-developed nations measuring access to social justice and the opportunities they afford their respective citizens and residents.

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