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Dr. Sanjay Gupta explains why Trump’s quick trip to Walter Reed raises more questions

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President Donald Trump went to Walter Reed over the weekend, claiming that nothing was wrong, but CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta explained it wasn’t a typical routine medical exam done every year for presidents.

Speaking Sunday, Dr. Gupta explained that medical issues are typically done by doctors on duty at the White House, and there isn’t a need to go to the hospital.

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“No question, this sounds a bit unusual,” he said. “I mean typically even with this White House, we’ve gotten plenty of notice in the past that the president was going to be getting a physical exam, that it was going to take place at Walter Reed, which, it has in the past. Everyone institution-wide received noticed, and it doesn’t seem like that happened in this case.”

He explained that “basic labs” and a “physical exam” were done, but Dr. Gupta has visited the medical facilities available at the White House, and both of those things could have been done there.

“So, the question really becomes what was done at Walter Reed that couldn’t have been done at the White House? Why was this split up? Why didn’t they just basically do the entire physical exam in one sitting as they have in the past? We don’t know the answers to these questions,” Gupta said.

Spokesperson Stephanie Grisham said that there were no medical problems, symptoms, or issues that inspired the visit. Gupta said that would be his first question.

“Was it something that sort of prompted that?” he asked. “Again, no suggestion of that.”

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Trump is classified as obese and has a common form of heart disease for which he takes medication.

The White House doesn’t anticipate Trump to follow up with information about this exam until as late as 2020.

Watch his full report below:

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Matt Gaetz attempts to derail impeachment hearing and gets shut down by Chairman Nadler for yelling

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Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) was rebuked on Monday after he attempted to derail a House Judiciary Committee hearing on impeachment.

As Monday's hearing was getting underway, Gaetz joined Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA), the ranking Republicans member, in trying to undermine the proceedings.

"Mr. Chairman!" Republicans clamored as Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-NY) introduced the witness.

"I have a parliamentary enquiry," Gaetz said.

"I will not recognize a parliamentary enquiry at this time," Nadler told Gaetz.

Undaunted, Gaetz continued: "Is this when we just hear staff ask questions of other staff?"

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Former Republican Congressman admits he ‘can’t explain’ Ted Cruz: ‘You’d think he’d have more self-respect’

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"So, Charlie, what's going on here?" asked CNN host Fredricka Whitfield.

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Trump’s next 100 days will dictate whether he can be re-elected or not — here’s why

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According to CNN pollster-in-residence Harry Enten, Donald Trump's next 100 days -- which could include an impeachment trial in the Senate -- will hold the key to whether he will remain president in 2020.

As Eten explains in a column for CNN, "His [Trump's] approval rating has been consistently low during his first term. Yet his supporters could always point out that approval ratings before an election year have not historically been correlated with reelection success. But by mid-March of an election year, approval ratings, though, become more predictive. Presidents with low approval ratings in mid-March of an election year tend to lose, while those with strong approval ratings tend to win in blowouts and those with middling approval ratings usually win by small margins."

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