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Giuliani henchman charged in Ukraine case could get house arrest as he awaits trial

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An associate of Rudy Giuliani could possibly remain under house arrest while he awaits his trial on charges of campaign finance violations, depending on what a judge decides this Friday, Reuters reports.

Belarus-born businessman Igor Fruman’s lawyer will argue to a US District judge that he should be able to have more freedom of movement before his trial, saying that the conditions of his bail are “onerous” and he doesn’t pose a flight risk.

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As Reuters points out, Fruman is accused along with his business partner, Ukraine-born Lev Parnas, of using a shell company to donate $325,000 to a pro-Trump PAC and of raising money for former U.S. Rep. Pete Sessions (R-TX) as part of an effort to have the Trump remove the U.S. ambassador to Ukraine. The ambassador, Marie Yovanovitch, was fired by Trump in May.

Parnas and Fruman are also charged with illegally funneling money from a Russian businessman to US political candidates to help them get permits for a marijuana business that never got off the ground.

Featured image via Shutterstock


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Congressional subpoenas will be ‘forever unenforceable’ if GOP lets Trump off the hook: conservative attorney

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Conservative attorney Gabriel Malor, who in the past has written legal analyses for right-wing publications such as The Federalist and the Washington Examiner, warns that Republicans will be setting a dangerous precedent if they let President Donald Trump off the hook for his unprecedented obstruction of the House of Representatives' impeachment inquiry.

Writing on Twitter, Malor argues that giving Trump a pass on the House's proposed obstruction of Congress charge will neuter any future congressional inquiry into the executive branch.

"There's a real danger that if the Senate does not convict on the obstruction of Congress count, congressional subpoenas will be forever unenforceable," he writes. "If Congress itself rules that defiance of congressional subpoenas is no error, how could the courts in any future litigation?"

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Lawmakers green light US space force

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The United States is getting a new space force along with $738 billion in military spending under an agreement backed by lawmakers on Tuesday that fulfils a priority of President Donald Trump.

The fiscal year 2020 spending in the National Defense Authorization Act is a jump from the $716 billion authorized last year, and will go to pay for a wide range of military activities.

It will also create a space-based sixth branch of the military, a priority of Trump's, after the army, air force, navy, Marine Corps and coast guard.

The bill has won the approval of Democratic and Republican lawmakers in both the House and Senate armed services committees, making its passage in Congress likely.

The bill, which Congress must pass each year, allocates $635 billion to the Pentagon, and another $23.1 billion to the Department of Energy for the US nuclear arsenal's maintenance and fuel.

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Trump wrote a $2 million check to cover damages from misuse of charity funds: report

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New York Attorney General Letitia James revealed Tuesday that President Donald Trump has paid $2 million in damages after being found guilty for misuse of charity funds.

The Washington Post also reported that the remaining $1.8 million left in Trump's "foundation," would be distributed to eight charities, which will get $476,140.41. The foundation was shut down in 2018 after a judge demanded it be desolved.

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