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Protests drive record poll turnout in Hong Kong

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Hong Kong’s voters turned out in record numbers Sunday for local council elections that the city’s pro-democracy movement hopes will pile pressure on the Beijing-backed government to heed their demands after months of violent protest.

Lengthy queues snaked out of polling stations across the territory in the election for 18 district councils, where high turnout is expected to benefit democratic forces.

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The Electoral Affairs Commission said a record 56 percent of the 4.13 million citizens registered to vote had cast their ballots by Sunday evening.

It was already the highest turnout in Hong Kong’s history of district council elections post handover from British rule, with five hours of voting still to go.

The selection of 452 councillors — handling community-level concerns such as bus routes and garbage collection — traditionally generates little excitement, but has taken on new significance following months of political unrest.

AFP / YE AUNG THU Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam casts her vote during district council elections

Hong Kong has been battered by months of mass rallies and violent clashes pitting police against protesters who are agitating for direct popular elections of the semi-autonomous Chinese territory’s government, as well as a probe into alleged police brutality.

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District councils have long been dominated by the pro-Beijing establishment, and voters seeking change hope that weakening that grip will give their movement fresh momentum.

“Even though one ballot can only help a little, I still hope it can bring change to society and support street protests in some way,” 19-year-old student Michael Ng, voting for the first time, told AFP.

The vote is the closest Hong Kongers get to direct representation.

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– Voting for choice –

AFP / VIVEK PRAKASH Voters line up to cast their ballot in Hong Kong’s district council elections

The territory’s top-level legislature is elected by a mix of popular vote and seats reserved for industry groups stacked with China loyalists, which ensures Beijing’s control of the city of around 7.5 million.

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The pro-democracy camp is calling Sunday’s vote a referendum on Chief Executive Carrie Lam and the pro-Beijing government, who have resisted the movement’s demands.

“We are voting to give our judgement on what has happened… we’re also voting to make a choice for what is yet to come,” said Jimmy Sham, a pro-democracy candidate and a prominent figure in the largely leaderless protest movement.

But the polls are not entirely symbolic: some candidates for next year’s legislative elections will be drawn from district councillors, and the bodies also will contribute 117 members to the 1,200-strong Beijing-controlled electoral college that chooses the chief executive.

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Protests have been muted in recent days after pro-democracy figures urged citizens to cease disruptions to avoid giving the government an excuse to delay or suspend the polls.

No major disturbances were reported.

“I’m pleased to say that… we should have a relatively peaceful and calm environment to conduct these elections successfully,” Lam said after voting in her constituency on Hong Kong island.

The political unrest kicked into high gear with giant rallies in June against a bill backed by Lam that would allow extraditions to China’s opaque justice system.

The bill was eventually withdrawn as public pressure grew, but the anger that it unleashed sparked wider calls for democracy.

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Chinese state media also ground into gear for election day, trotting out editorials urging Hong Kong residents “to vote to end violence” — which Beijing blames on rioting youths.

In a tweet the state-run Global Times posted a bizarre rap video splicing shots of violent clashes and positive interactions between Hong Kong residents and the police, opining “Go tell ’em / people want a peaceful place.”

Analysts expect pro-democracy candidates to see gains in the district councils but still fall short of a majority of slots.

Campaigning has been marred by acrimony, with one pro-democracy candidate having his ear bitten off in an attack, while 17 other candidates of all stripes have been arrested over protest-related activities.

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Election authorities banned leading democracy activist Joshua Wong from running in the district poll for backing Hong Kong “self-determination”.


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