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Rudy Giuliani claims he was being ‘sarcastic’ when he said he had ‘insurance’ if Trump turns on him

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Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, who is now a lawyer for President Donald Trump, tweeted on Saturday that his earlier comments about having “insurance” if Trump throws him under the bus to escape impeachment were “sarcastic” and, at the same time, a warning to former Vice President Joe Biden’s family.

“TRUTH ALERT: The statement I’ve made several times of having an insurance policy, if thrown under bus, is sarcastic & relates to the files in my safe about the Biden Family’s 4 decade monetizing of his office,” Giuliani tweeted. “If I disappear, it will appear immediately along with my RICO chart.”

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On previous occasions Giuliani has seemingly intimated that he could retaliate against Trump if the president and his supporters decide to make him into a scapegoat to protect the president from impeachment. In an interview with Fox News’ Ed Henry on Saturday, Giuliani said that “I’ve seen things written like he’s going to throw me under the bus. When they say that, I say he isn’t, but I have insurance.”

He added, “This is ridiculous. We are very good friends. He knows what I did was in order to defend him, not to dig up dirt on [former Vice President Joe] Biden. This goes back a year ago, before Biden had even decided to run for president.”

Earlier this month Giuliani had the following exchange with The Guardian.

In a telephone interview with the Guardian, in response to a question about whether he was nervous that Trump might “throw him under a bus” in the impeachment crisis, Giuliani said, with a slight laugh: “I’m not, but I do have very, very good insurance, so if he does, all my hospital bills will be paid.”

Giuliani’s lawyer, Robert Costello, who was also on the call, then interjected: “He’s joking.”

There have been other indications that Republicans may try to pin the scandals besetting Trump in the impeachment inquiry on his attorney. Earlier this month Gordon Sondland, the president’s ambassador to the European Union, testified that Giuliani had tried to arrange a quid pro quo with the Ukrainian government to get them to publicly announce investigations into Burisma, a Ukrainian gas company that employed Biden’s son Hunter, as well as into a conspiracy theory that there was a missing Democratic National Committee server from the 2016 election in Ukraine. Although Sondland said that Giuliani “was expressing the desires of the President of the United States,” Rep. Doug Lamborn, R-Colo., suggested to reporters outside the hearing room that if Giuliani was “off on his own mission doing things that people didn’t know about, kind of like a loose cannon, then that’s a Rudy Giuliani thing, that’s not a President Trump thing.”

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Earlier this month a Republican member of one of the impeachment committees conveyed a similar thought to Axios.

“[T]his is not an impeachment of Rudy Giuliani, it’s not an impeachment of Ambassador Sondland. It’s an impeachment of the president of the United States,” the unnamed legislator said. “So the point is as long as this is a step removed, he’s in good shape. … If it’s a step removed from the president, he doesn’t lose any Republicans in the House.”

The controversy over Trump involves concerns about whether he withheld $391 million in U.S. military aid to Ukraine in order to compel Zelensky to publicly announce investigations that would either discredit the accusations that the Trump campaign colluded with Russia and/or politically harm Biden, who polls have previously suggested would be among the strongest Democrats to oppose Trump in next year’s election.

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Trump officials demanded the Army ‘dig for misconduct’ to justify firing Lt. Col. Vindman

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This week, Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman willingly left the Army after decades of honorable service. He cited a concerted campaign of "bullying" from the highest branches of power in the United States, and now more details are becoming known.

A New Yorker report revealed that top aides to President Donald Trump were told that they needed to find dirt on Vindman that could justify the firing of the decorated war hero.

"Vindman expected to go to the National War College this fall—a low-profile assignment—then take another foreign posting," the New Yorker reported. "But, in a final act of revenge, the White House recently made clear that Trump opposed Vindman’s promotion. Senior Administration officials told [Defense Secretary Mark] Esper and Ryan McCarthy, the Secretary of the Army, to dig for misconduct that would justify blocking Vindman’s promotion. They couldn’t find anything, multiple sources told me. Others in the military chain of command began to warn Vindman that he would never be deployable overseas again—despite his language skills and regional expertise."

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George Conway reveals how Mary Trump’s book and the Supreme Court prove the ‘walls are closing in’ on the president

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Republican lawyer and "Lincoln Project" co-founder, George Conway, wrote in a Washington Post column Thursday that there are a lot of commonalities in Mary Trump's forthcoming tell-all book and the Supreme Court decision passed down in President Donald Trump's case with New York prosecutor Cy Vance.

Mary Trump, who is a clinical psychologist, delivers "professional judgments about the president's indisputable narcissism and, perhaps, sociopathy dovetail with those that other experts have reached before," wrote Conway. "Yet it's not the possible diagnoses that give Mary Trump's book its punch. It's the factual detail — detail that only a family member could provide."

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Tennessee Republican says he hasn’t ‘really studied’ whether the Civil War was about slavery

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On Thursday, The Tennessean's Natalie Allison reported that Tennessee state Rep. Mike Sparks, who makes a habit of complaining that "young people" and "journalists" don't bother to study history, could not answer a basic question about what the Civil War was fought over.

"Was the Civil War about slavery?" asked a reporter.

"I haven't really studied it," said Sparks.

"You said you know history!" said another reporter.

"I just think we need to all study history," said Sparks, still not answering the question. "There's different contexts."

This comes during a debate over whether to remove a bust of Confederate general and suspected Klan leader Nathan Bedford Forrest. Another lawmaker, state Sen. Joey Hensley, defended Forrest, arguing that "3,000 Blacks attended his funeral" — a common but unproven claim of Confederate sympathizers.

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